Federalist No. 51 Assignment Essay

Federalist No. 51 Assignment Essay

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Federalist No. 51 Assignment
James Madison’s Federalist No. 51, in summation, explains what, why, and how there is the need of the separation of powers; legislative, judicial, and executive branches. Through Madison’s argument, checking ambition with ambition, he eloquently portrays, how the power of the government is to be divided up between the three branches of government. This is all referring to the looming ratification of the Constitution; he, James Madison, Jon Jay, and Alexander Hamilton, want to be ratified by the states. They use the power of the New York Press, to gain political support, as well as, explain the legislator put forth to the citizenry.
The why, ambition of man, Madison goes on to explain, is the reason why there is the necessity for a checks-and-balances governmental system. Thusly, when one man fights for his ambition, another man can possibly lose some of his. This ambition is regarding to the literary conceptualization of the ideas life, liberty, and property. In order to keep this person from becoming too powerful in the government, he alludes to another entity offsetting this person with their own ambition. In other words, this is the generally idea behind the checks and balances governmental system proposed by the ratification of the Constitution.
The how, the three separate systems of government, is the means in which this idealistic system of government can be achieved. Madison exalts the usage, in accordance to the absolute demand for, of the legislative, executive, and judicial. The legislative is the branch to make the laws. To keep this legislative from becoming too powerful, it’s ambition, it will be divided in to the Senate and the House of Representatives. There is even a balance of po...


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...resentatives, Madison did not believe the common public had enough information to make these types of decisions appropriately. Even though this was a later amendment to the constitution, it shows his indifference in the matter at hand.
In summation, through Madison’s argument that power divided in through the three branches of government, can better serve democracy, than virtuous citizens. By pitting ambition against ambition of the separate forms of government, while keeping and dividing them up, so they do not have similar aspirations; makes the operationalization of the Constitution’s branches more suited for the task at hand. Likewise, even though he dictated the more interest, ambitions, or human nature separated the better, he voice that everyday population might not make the best decisions to elect Judicial Representatives, since they serve for life.






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