Essay about The Federalist Age Of Passion

Essay about The Federalist Age Of Passion

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The Federalist Age, or the Age of Passion, is a time of political turmoil as the United States continues to experiment with republican governing ideals. Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and John Adams are among the most prominent figures during the Age of Passion, each having a different idea for how this new federal government should be structured in order to form a more perfect union; bringing the heterogeneous and scattered population of the country into unity, and achieving independence from outside powers that would want to stake a claim in the New World.
Hamilton can only be described as a financially savvy, radical Federalists with the intent on forming a government that mirrors the British system. He wanted a government where, at the federal level, there was almost absolute authority on all matters over the state level of government. It was his belief that the nation should focus on industrialization and commercialization, and that the federal government should act as a positive and guiding force in shaping the economy. To unify the nation, a strong central government to lead all of the subordinate state and local governments, streamlining the economy with the National Bank, and the formation of the New Army were all necessary in the eyes of Hamilton for the Federalist party to maintain political dominance, and for the United States to rise above the label of an infant country many foreign powers viewed it to be. State and local governments were assigned, in the Constitution, all powers not expressly stated given to the federal government. Hamilton, during his role as the Secretary of Treasury , used the ambiguous Necessary and Proper clause of the Constitution to usurp the undefined powers of ...


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...ing ambitious steps to destroy the Republican proto-party, and even going so far as to criticize Adams and his Federalists who were trying to maintain a more moderate approach to the France crisis. Adams planned to negotiate peace with France, and threatened to resign if Hamiltonian Federalists would not agree to his plan. After the compromise, Adams retired to his home for eight months while Hamilton cannibalized the Federalist party with his radical plans of restructuring the great states. Adams left the political life in a much more graceful way than Hamilton, who lost most support and faded away into obscurity for his polarizing policies, but Jefferson and Madison were just beginning power play for the turn of the century because after Adams’ presidency, they would be elected and carry the Republican ideals long after the fall of the Federalist proto-party.

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