Federal Constitution Essay

Federal Constitution Essay

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The simple turn of a century from the late 1700's to the 1800's brought about drastic change in regard to the United States government. Not only had the rebellious colonies overthrown the oppressive rule of their mother country Britain, but they had already begun to establish their own political domain. Within this realm of the newly founded democracy were two conflicting parties. On one side was the Jeffersonian Republicans, led by Thomas Jefferson himself and later on by James Madison. Those who composed this legislative faction tended to believe in strong state governments, a feeble central government, and a rigid interpretation of the constitution. Opposing the Jeffersonian Republicans were the Federalists of America. The federalists craved for a mighty central government with less powerful state governments, and a loose interpretation of the Constitution. The two parties had divergent standpoints ranging from religion to admission of states into the American union. With respect to the federal Constitution, the Federalists acquired a consistently flexible interpretation of it. On the other hand, the Jeffersonian Republicans flip-flopped. At the onset of the 19'th century, Thomas Jefferson and his followers rigidly abided by it. Eventually the party possessed a rather wishy-washy construction.
Born into a wealthy Virginian family in 1743, Thomas Jefferson grew up to become president of the United States in 1800. He brought an unprecedented sense of commitment to office, believing in smaller central governments with stronger state governments. Jefferson and his Republican followers were devoted to living by the constitution as it pertained to states rights.

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...stance with respect to the Constitution. Quite the opposite, the Jeffersonian Republicans were of two minds when it came to the Constitution; they went from living by it with states rights to forgetting about it when the Louisiana Purchase came along. From this, one may wonder why the Federalist party died out after the Hartford Convention. The triumph of the Jeffersonian Republicans over the Federalists is due to the Republicans ability to adjust to circumstances. Within the time period of 1801 to 1817, Jeffersonian Republicans recognized that their ideals and philosophy weren't always best for the nation. Hence, the Republicans evolved
from a rigid interpretation of the Constitution to a more permissive one. Therefore, the styles of interpretation of the American Constitution amongst the Federalists and Jeffersonian Republicans was never distinctly characterized.

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