Essay about False Confessions By Richard Leo

Essay about False Confessions By Richard Leo

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False confessions are receiving more public attention now that people are speaking out about having to serve jail time for a crime they did not commit. 2015 was a year to remember for false confessions starting in January when a man was released after serving 21 years in prison. The protocols that interrogators are trained to follow are dangerous because they allow investigators to have complete influence on innocent people to make false confessions.
Most people believe that all interrogators are trained to use mental and physical abusive tactics because it appears on the media and news so often, therefore making it believable to blame them for false confessions. “Interrogation is derived from the latin roots inter (in the presence of) and rogre (to ask)...There are no nefarious connotations, elements of torture, or illegal activities associated with the action of interrogation”(Boetig). Richard Leo, a psychology and law professor at the University of San Francisco, has extensively researched false confessions during police interrogations and has concluded the following:
there are two main psychological steps to get a suspect to confess during an interrogation. First, convince the person that they 've been caught -- that there 's so much evidence against them that they have no choice but to confess. Second, interrogators convince a person it 's in their self-interest to stop denying what they did and start admitting their guilt...But those two steps can lead to false confessions in some instances .(Gerber)
The system did not intend for tactics taught to interrogators to be violent or use physical force to generate a confession from a suspect or witness. When the term false confession from interrogation is mentioned, most thi...


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...7). That means he must have done it, right?
There are actual laws to protect those being interrogated from police brutality in a case. "The purpose of the Miranda rule is to prevent forced confessions or, to put it more bluntly, torture"(Frank). Police interrogators force false confessions either by violent nature, or just to create the image that they found the criminal and got them off the streets. Either way, it 's illegal, yet still constantly happening. Those who are supposed to enforce the laws are actually breaking them.
Police protocols in an interrogation form an incentive for the suspect to form a false confession. The mental and physical abuse suspect experience in interrogation in unacceptable. All these examples prove that Police need to have officers trained to insure no physical or emotional violence in an interrogation.

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