Fahrenheit 451 And Brave New World Essay

Fahrenheit 451 And Brave New World Essay

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“Then the LORD saw that the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually” (New International Version, Genesis 6:5). Despite man’s greatest efforts to be perfect, man always falls short because of total depravity. Even the highest forms of meditation and concentration can not free one from continually thinking evil thoughts. Despite knowing humans possess a predisposition to flaws, we show a fascination with the search for perfection. Fahrenheit 451 and Brave New World both portray a utopia through the inspiration of the current society and predictions of future societies. Written in 1953 by Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451 demonstrates his concerns during the McCarthy era about the threat of book burning in the United States and its ramifications. Also, the title refers to the temperature at which book paper catches fire and burns. Additionally, Brave New World was written by Aldous Huxley and published in 1932. The book takes place in London in 632 A.F. (After Henry Ford) and anticipates how advancements in reproductive technology, sleep-learning, psychological manipulation, and classical conditioning will change society. In these novels, attempts of paradise occur through conditioning, America becomes categorized as a dystopia, horrifying but realistic realities transpire, and increased efficiency of human reproduction is sought after with assembly lines. Utopian societies remain unrealistic and unattainable because man is naturally inadequate.
Instead of making life paradise, the World State creates contentment by conditioning and numbing individuals to their feelings. In reference to conditioning, the Director explains, “And that, that is the secret of happi...


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...d using assembly lines to produce humans.
Despite the two author’s intentions to depict utopian fantasies, they produced more ties to the dystopian aspects of humans and society. In an attempt to portray an accurate paradise, conditioning and assembly lines seek to increase the production of humans. Also, the characterization of American as a dystopia is shown, and descriptions of a horrifying but realistic future disturb readers. As technology continues to improve, it will continue to try to increase mankind’s standard of living and its journey towards perfection. Unfortunately, mankind does not take into account the corruption of technology and their own corruption. As the Bible clearly states, we remain evil from the moment we become conceived until we die and suffer from the inability of perfection. “Who can make the clean out of the unclean? No one!” (Job 14:4).

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Fahrenheit 451 And Brave New World Essay

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