Essay about F. Scott Fitzgerald 's The Great Gatsby

Essay about F. Scott Fitzgerald 's The Great Gatsby

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“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness” (Jefferson). These infamous words have been a foundation for American society for over two hundred and fifty years, and are embedded in the heart and soul of every American’s dream. The idea of the glamorous “American Dream” is one of the most important themes threaded into the text. Although, in The Great Gatsby Fitzgerald uses the American Dream as a destructive and addicting drug that forces the characters to succumb to its power, which in the end causes them immense pain, due to their excessive lifestyles. In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s timeless novel The Great Gatsby the American Dream causes pain to Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, and Tom Buchanan.
Now, the character with the least amount of rational judgment and steadfast aspirations of his dream is Jay Gatsby. Despite being born into a poor family young James Gatz (Gatsby) makes it to the big city with the help of a sailor and entrepreneur Dan Cody, to fulfill his dreams of becoming a powerful man in society. The means by which Gatsby acquires his fortunes are a true Catch 22 in their own right because Gatsby finds his wealth in the sale and distribution of alcohol during the Prohibition Era, which is highly illegal. Jay Gatsby’s dream is to find love and prosperity with a former flame of his, Daisy Fay, who marries Tom Buchanan as a result of Gatsby going off to fight in the Great War. Naturally, the audience’s first glimpse of the Great Gatsby is in chapter one where Nick Carraway describes him with outstretched arms, ambitiously fetching for his dream, the g...


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...en, more money, and more power. All of these elements of his dream are what ultimately causes him deep agony.
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a prime example of a damaging version of the “American Dream”, especially when following the stories of Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, and Tom Buchanan. Gatsby’s clouded judgment and addiction to the idea of possessing Daisy, Nick’s clear head and rational thinking, as well as Tom’s careless ambition all send these men into some version of heartbreak. In the heart of the roaring twenties money and social class meant everything and Fitzgerald shows how this arrogance can influence decent people. “The best work of literature to represent the American Dream is 'The Great Gatsby ' by F. Scott Fitzgerald. It shows us how dreaming can be tainted by reality, and that if you don 't compromise, you may suffer” (Nafisi).

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