Exodus and the Ethics of Labor Essay

Exodus and the Ethics of Labor Essay

Length: 1557 words (4.4 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Oppression is something that has been repeated throughout history all over the world. Whether it was the oppression of Black Americans during the Jim Crow period or the oppression of Jews in Nazi Germany during World War II, oppression is an unethical act that humanity has not yet moved past. Looking to the Bible as a source of Christian ethics in terms of how to fight oppression and promote equality brings to attention how God intended His people to be treated, especially the poor and the helpless. The book of Exodus is a primary guide for what the ethics of labor ought to be in the work force to avoid oppression. One might reference the story of the Israelites in the book of Exodus. The Israelites are under the thumb of the Pharaoh and the Egyptians that force them into slave labor. The grueling and overly strenuous labor conditions in which the Israelites are put under is comparable to the labor conditions that the employees of slaughterhouses are forced to endure today, as illustrated by Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser. By comparing these two labor conditions, the reader is able to apply the Biblical ethics found in Exodus to modern times.
“Knocker, Sticker, Shackler, Rumper, First Legger, Knuckle Dropper,” these are just a few of the positions the workers at a slaughterhouse get assigned to. Simply reading the names of the above job positions induces a sense of nausea and hints at the inherent brutality that these positions demand (Schlosser, 172). Because the weight and size of cows is unpredictable, most of the labor in the slaughterhouse must be done by hand. On the kill floor of a slaughterhouse, workers are forced to slice cattle into halves with a power saw “as though they were two-by-fours,” (Schlosser, 170). Wo...


... middle of paper ...


...is people to be free and live and work under ethical and just conditions. Jesus preaches that as long as the Israelites follow his commandments, they will be “treasured among all people” and that they will live in a “land of milk and honey,” (Exodus 3:8). Unlike the unethical laws that the Pharaoh forced upon the Israelites, Jesus’s commandments are moral and promote the common good of the whole community.
The Bible says in Exodus 1:12, “But the more they were oppressed, the more they multiplied and spread.” This provides hope the workers in the slaughterhouses whom are still forced to work under unsafe conditions today. The workers must become collectively active and speak up and fight for their right to an ethical work environment. Ultimately, the minorities and immigrants will become the majority, and the “dictators” of the world will be forced to step down.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Exodus : The Book Of Exodus Essay

- The book of Exodus is the story of God delivering the children of Israel from Egypt and making them his chosen people. Exodus records more miracles of God than any other book in the Old Testament. It’s where we find the stories of the Ten Plagues, the first Passover, the parting of the Red Sea, the Ten Commandments, the Burning Bush and the Golden Calf. Exodus describes how God can deliver those who sin by taking him/her through the difficult times of life, and guiding them to the Promise Land. Israelites are often referred to as the “chosen people,” God chose Israel because he made an covenant with Israel forefather, Abraham, to stray his descendants away from the land of slavery, from the...   [tags: Moses, Bible, The Exodus, Book of Exodus]

Better Essays
1577 words (4.5 pages)

Exodus: Movement of Jah People Essays

- Rastafarian people share similarities with their role models, the Israelites, from the Biblical Book of Exodus. They are connected through Rastafarianism, a postcolonial religion the Jamaicans created, where the oppressed people sought to return to their ancestral promised land. Songs from Bob Marley such as “Africa Unite,” “Buffalo Soldier,” and “Exodus” display the Jamaican’s overcoming the European colonialism, how urgent it is to unite as one African body, and to return to Ethiopia. This is just like the Book of Exodus when Moses led his fellow oppressed Israelite community out of Egypt from the harsh ruler and returned to Israel....   [tags: rastafarian people, bible, exodus]

Better Essays
1009 words (2.9 pages)

Exodus : The Book Of Exodus Essay examples

- The Book of Exodus encompasses several of the most significant individuals, as well as events. In the Book of Exodus, Moses was a prominent character that was discussed seemingly throughout the text (Harper 's Bible Dictionary 1952, 655). The Book of Exodus is a segment within the Pentateuch, which covers the first five accounts of the Old Testament. There are three noticeable premises that are accentuated in Exodus, which are deliverance, the covenant, and the Promised Land. The opening section of the Book, which is separated into two parts, is the first eighteen chapters, which review Moses’ lifetime, the dilemmas that the Israelites’ met whilst in Egypt, and the events and plagues that dr...   [tags: Moses, Bible, The Exodus, Israelites]

Better Essays
915 words (2.6 pages)

Essay on The Theme of Growth in Exodus

- The Theme of Growth in Exodus  Exodus, by Leon Uris, is a novel of genuine Affirmation. One of the most prevalent of the affirmative themes is the idea of growth. Many of the characters learn a lot about themselves, and change tremendously in a positive way. Earlier in their lives, these characters decided to live their life one way, but throughout the book they change, and join each other to unite. Fighting for their common religion and fundamental rights brought them together in a way that is barely imaginable....   [tags: Exodus]

Better Essays
1611 words (4.6 pages)

The Book of Exodus Essay

-            The book of Exodus is the second book of the Pentateuch, or Weelleh Shemoth according to the Hebrew Bible. The books main theme is the removal of Hebrew people from Egypt. The book is meant to be a continuation of Genesis. Moses is believed to be the author of this book. During the period of Exodus Israel had been in Egypt for about 215 years. The book begins with the birth of Moses. The book then goes on to talk about the life of Moses and the things that he did throughout his life. The book also explains how the Hebrews were enslaved and then let free....   [tags: Introduction to the Book of Exodus]

Better Essays
845 words (2.4 pages)

What is the Significance of Exodus 31:12 - 18 in Relationship to Jewish Beliefs?

- Within Exodus 31:12 - 18 Moses is told the importance of the seventh day by God, he is reminded that it must be kept holy. The significance of the sabbath is of clear importance to the Jews who are told, “Ye shall keep the sabbath therefore; for it is holy unto you: every one that defileth it shall surely be put to death”. (Exodus 31:14) For Jews, defiling the Sabbath day is one of the top sins, only outranked by those of idol worship and murder, historically people have been stoned to death for committing this sin....   [tags: sabbath day, Moses, jews, exodus ]

Better Essays
1511 words (4.3 pages)

Essay about Labor and Alienation

- “Political economy conceals the estrangement inherent in the nature of labor by not considering the direct relationship between the worker (labor) and production” (Pg. 30). According to Marx, human nature is neither fixed nor transcendent; instead, it is alterable and embedded in the productivity of everyday life. The only fixed attribute that we have is our openness. We are different from other animal species in the sense that we are able to adapt to different natural environments by creating a social environment....   [tags: Labor]

Better Essays
1721 words (4.9 pages)

The Knights of Labor Essay

- The Knights of Labor represented the pinnacle of the up lift labor movement. They, at one time, had membership that numbered in the hundreds of thousands and nearly hit a million members. This organization was unique in its time because it espoused many of the ideals we hold today as statutory for an ethical and equitable society as well as employee and employer relationships. The Knights of Labor did not begrudge industry or capitalism, moreover they were less of a concern than the organization’s larger goal to protect and promote social equity in labor and society, for the common man....   [tags: Labor Issues]

Better Essays
1316 words (3.8 pages)

Labor Relations Essay

- From the beginning, the American Federation of Labor (AFL) set out to be a different. Rather than focusing on remolding American life and the institutions in control of American life, the AFL sought to better workers lives by securing higher wages, a shorter work day, and more favorable working conditions (Holley, Jennings, & Wolters, 2009). The AFL also divided membership up by trade, recognizing that different skilled trades had individualized needs (Holley, Jennings, & Wolters, 2009). The Haymarket Riot, Homestead Incident, and the Pullman Strike all played a role in the rise and decline of the AFL....   [tags: Labor Unions]

Better Essays
952 words (2.7 pages)

Counseling Ethics Essay

- When a help-seeker experiences a warm and loving Christian relationship within the body of Christ, spiritual and emotional growth ensues. A counsellor then, who works in Gods vineyard, or in a church school or even a Para-church organization/charity therefore opens the gate for many new possibilities for ministry, both within the body of Christ and to the unsaved population through the body of Christ. Without mincing words; one can say: Before a counselor, therapist, or pastoral counselor, can confidently say that he/she really knows what he/she is doing in therapy, many years would have elapsed and accumulation of experiences, training and re-training would have populated his practicing....   [tags: Ethics]

Better Essays
794 words (2.3 pages)