Essay on Evolution of Buddhism

Essay on Evolution of Buddhism

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The world as we know it evolves every day; the people who inhabit it evolve, our languages evolve, our religions evolve. The religions that first began when humans became civilized are not the same as those practiced today. Everything as we know it shape shifts in order to fit into modern standards. One of those religions that have evolved from the beginning is Buddhism. The whole ideology of Buddhism appeals to more people than some of the other religious groups. Why is this so? Is it because of its concepts that it teaches or the fact that it does not focus on a “god” as much as western religions do.
Before setting into the concepts of Buddhism that were the most intriguing, I think it is noteworthy about the creation of it. The Buddha was not a remarkable man in the beginning. He was a privileged boy who was to be a warrior. He ran off and starved under a tree in order to find a solution on how to end suffering. The Buddha voluntarily starved himself to near death until he was able to reach that point in his life of enlightenment. The Buddha did not go around curing people of their diseases and miraculasing turning elements into another. He led a simple life traveling around teaching others on how to reach the enlightment as well. The Dharma was not a book about his life rather than simply his teachings. This is very different from the idea of Jesus within the Christian religion. My point of view is coming from a very biased position I must ass because I do not support the Christian religion as much. The Holy Bible first differs from the Dharma because it is a book of stories as well as the teaching of Jesus. Jesus is a man held in high regard for he was able to cure the sick of their aliments and turn water into wine. He died...


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...only emphasizes are reaching self-liberation. There is not time to waste on others that need help getting to that spot as well. There is one aspect that I do not particularly agree with. As previously stated in the beginning of this essay, I reflected on the idea of Buddha just simply being a man. Nothing was there to portray him as a god. In the Mahayana practice they view him not as a man but as a god.
Buddhism is quickly growing in popularity in the western world particularly with the younger generations. This is because it is the only religion that can be practiced not from a religious stand point. Buddhism can be embraced as spiritual adventure where the person focus’s mostly on nature. Buddhism is full interesting concepts and has the easiest religious text to read. Out of all the religions I have learned about throughout life. Buddhism is the best so far.


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