Euthanasia: Escaping Dreadful Destinies Essay

Euthanasia: Escaping Dreadful Destinies Essay

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If a loved one has a terminal or incurable disease, is it morally right to allow one to control his fate and die with dignity or die a long, excruciating death? The process of killing patients with terminal or incurable diseases, known as euthanasia, allows people to die without suffering. Within Sophocles’ play Antigone, Antigone commits suicide so she does not have to endure her death sentence. Sophocles’ Antigone, and other modern events, provide the knowledge that allowing people to die with dignity is morally right; euthanasia and physician assisted suicide would enable patients with terminal or incurable diseases to die with dignity before it destroys their health.
There are two types of euthanasia, known as active and passive euthanasia. Administering lethal drugs that kill the patient with permission from the patient or a person in charge of one’s wishes qualifies as active euthanasia (Alters 3). Whereas active euthanasia kills the patient with drugs, passive euthanasia removes or stops a patient’s life saving medical treatment so the person can die naturally (Alters 3).
Active euthanasia contains three processes: voluntary, non-voluntary, and involuntary euthanasia. Voluntary euthanasia includes having a patient give the doctor orders to end his or her life (Frey 324). Non-voluntary euthanasia involves one taking the steps to end the live of someone else that qualifies as incompetent by legal and medical authorities (Frey 324). And when steps are taken to end a patient’s life without the patient’s consent qualifies as involuntary euthanasia (Frey 324). Experts call involuntary euthanasia murder, because no patient or any legal authority gives permission to end the life. When a patient wishes to end his or her own life, ...


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...meny and Geoffrey McNicoll. Vol. 1. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2003. 323-325. Gale Power Search. Web. 7 Jan. 2014.
Jackson, Julia Amanda. "The Ethics and Legality of Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide." Trace: Tennessee Research and Creative Exchange. U of Tennessee Knoxville, n.d. Web. 15 Jan. 2014. .
Sophocles. "Antigone." Trans. Paul Roche. The Oedipus Plays of Sophocles. By Sophocles. Trans. Paul Roche. New York City: Plume, 1991. 191-252. Print. This source that I am comparing euthanasia to.
Yount, Lisa. Physician-Assited Suicide and Euthanasia. New York City: Facts on File, 2000. Print. Library in a Book. This book provides the information about euthanasia's history, imporant figures, and biographical information. It also provides positive and negative opinions on assisted suicide and euthanasia.

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