women's Rights

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Before the Civil War, African-American women were enslaved and forced to work; they had no choice. Black women of that time period, such as Sojourner Truth and Harriet Jacobs, fought not only for equal rights for their race but also for equal rights for their sex. As white women supported the fight for equal rights for African-Americans, they became increasingly aware that they too were lacking rights as women. Male abolitionists would refuse to seat female delegates at conventions and looked upon themselves as the “sole liberators of passive, childlike slaves” (Andreas, Caulking, and Mantle 1, 2). Some women were independent and they would be provoked to work for men to be laughed at in public. They would be impartial to the men even black women would be convinced to give in to the men. Work was one of the hardest things for the women to come by in the 1880s; they were becoming dependent for themselves. “Despite several decades’ worth of efforts to improve the lot of poor women,” it was hard for women to find independence (Watipka 1). Women would be accused of child abuse if they tried to divorce their husbands. They placed their lives on what they had, and they would give in to anything so that they could have money for freedom. They also would not make the same amount of income as men. Employers would say that women could not equal to the men. Women could not come in to a restaurant by themselves. Establishing women’s rights were important to make sure that women can have equal power and do more things. From 1588-1679 Jean Jaconet said that she would come up with a way to establish women’s rights. When United States entered World War 2, women’s rights started to come in to play. “Working was not new to women. Women have a... ... middle of paper ... .... 2. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005. 701-704. Student Resources in Context. Web. 9 Dec. 2 Jespersen, T. Christopher. "Human Rights." Encyclopedia of American Foreign Policy. Ed. Richard Dean Burns, Alexander DeConde, and Fredrik Logevall. 2nd ed. Vol. 2. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2002. Student Resources in Context. Web. 9 Dec. 2013.013. “Women's Rights." Civil Rights in America. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. Student RKanellos, Nicolás. "The Nineteenth Century." Hispanic American Almanac: A Reference Work on Hispanics in the United States. Ed. Sonia Benson. 3rd ed. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Student Resources in Context. Web. 9 Dec. 2013esources in Context. Web. 9 Dec. 2013 "Women's Rights." Civil Rights in America. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. Student Resources in Context. Web. 9 Dec. 2013

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