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why can they rule

Satisfactory Essays
Race and beliefs about race have had crucial effects on the course of American history. Omi and Winant argue that the concept of race developed gradually and was created to justify and explain inequality and genocide that characterizes European colonization. The resistant struggle of imperial domination from the higher classes to those of the lower classes also known as hegemony, was once legal through the eyes of the law and proven to be just through philosophy. They both believe race is something that is fluid, where "the racial order is organized and enforced by the continuity and reciprocity between micro-level and macro-level of social relations" .When asked the question “How has race determined inclusion, exclusion, and segregation in U.S. society” a few things come to mind, such as the issues that came about after the freeing of slaves or the treatment of African Americans following the slavery era. However, African Americans were not the only marginalized community affected. Many races including Native American, Hispanic and Asian societies each had a fair share of struggles when challenging the structures of domination that the U.S. had implemented for so long. In this paper I will argue that white Americans were protected through both science and law as they victimized inferior races through cruelty and the prohibition of resources valuable to the future of their race.
In the early 20th century social-reform policies across the world were formulated around the exclusion of unwanted populations also known as eugenics. “Eugenics justified social policies by encouraging the reproduction of ‘fit’ individuals while denying any reproduction to ‘unfit’ individuals” . The dominant upper-class white society used social Darwinism...

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...r president. African American ancestors that had given up on using their right to vote because of the many restriction may have unknowingly taught their child to do the same, giving African Americans even less of a voice in the government.

Works Cited

Michael Omi & Howard Winant, “Racial Formation,” in Race Critical Theories (2002), 125
James A. Tyner, “The Geopolitics of Eugenics and the Exclusion of Philippine Immigrants from the United States,” The Geographical Review, 89, no. 1 (1999), 54
James A. Tyner, “The Geopolitics of Eugenics and the Exclusion of Philippine Immigrants from the United States,” The Geographical Review, 89, no. 1 (1999), 56
Martha Menchaca and Richard R. Valencia, “Anglo-Saxon Ideologies in the 1920s-1930s:
The Impact on the Segregation of Mexican Students in California,” Anthropology &
Education Quarterly 21, no. 3 (1990): 222
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