gatdream F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby - Seeking the Unattainable Dream

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Great Gatsby - Seeking the Unattainable Dream What is the American Dream? America has evolved from an infant, struggling, nation to become a world power through its unprecedented economic growth. Driven by the tenets of independence, self reliance, and freedom, Americans have had the opportunity to pursue economic success. To many, this is the American Dream; to have freedom and the opportunity to pursue financial freedom. To others, such as Gatsby, Walter, and Jake, the American dream is happiness. They are driven by their dreams, seeking what they believe will make them happy. Gatsby and Jake seek happiness through love while Walter seeks happiness through money. The belief that bliss, utopia, and tranquility are within their grasps drives these characters. Yet the mere fact that their dreams are unattainable makes them flawed. Without dreams, Gatsby, Walter, and Jake lose their sense of purpose in life. Thus the pursuit of the American dream is a paradox. Achieving it is impossible, but without it, life will lose its purpose. Gatsby, Walter, and Jake are representations of the American dream because the love and happiness they seek are impossible to obtain. The birth of the desire for the happiness and love of the American dream in Gatsby occurred when he met a man named Dan Cody. After his disgust with college, Gatsby sought a new life. He found the promise of his fame and fortune in Dan Cody's yacht. "To young Gatz, resting on his oars and looking up at the railed deck, that yacht represented all the beauty and glamour in the world" (Fitzgerald 106). As soon as he borrowed the row boat that transported him to the yacht, Gatsby was no longer James Gatz, he had became Gatsby, inst... ... middle of paper ... ... education and money do not necessarily lead to happiness. "But excited monetary pursuit, Fitzgerald shows, goes hand in hand with personal anxiety: under the strain of competition, social life has become a medium of unease" (Fitter 8). The students of Mission should follow Walter's example and realize that their dream is oversimplified and flawed. They need to mature and realize that there are many pitfalls and problems that are created by money, and that they can find happiness through other things besides money such as family, religion, and love. Gatsby, Walter, and Jake are a representation of the American dream because the love and happiness they seek is impossible to obtain. Despite the impossibility, human beings need a dream in order to have a purpose in life. Without dreams life will become aimless, drying up like a raisin in the sun.

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