draft

631 Words3 Pages
Characteristics of Peanuts You may recognize Planters’ iconic Mr. Peanut and remember the taste of peanut butter in the peanut butter and jelly sandwich you had, but how much do you really know about this “nut”? Classification of Peanuts Although the American common name for Arachis hypogaea may mislead one into thinking are nuts, botanically they are not. Peanuts belong to the pea family classifying them as legumes like soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas even though they are considered dry fruits such as almonds, walnuts, and hazelnuts.[2] The peanut plant belongs to the domain Eukarya; all organisms in this domain have cells with a true nucleus, membrane bound organelles, and linear chromosomes in their nuclei. Most eukaryotic organisms are multicellular like peanuts.[3] Peanuts are classified under the kingdom Plantae; plants are multicellular and autotrophic with most being photosynthetic. Angiosperms like peanuts belong to the phylum Magnoliophyta; these plants have leaves, stems, roots, vascular tissue, flowers, and fruits (the peanut seed part that most people identify the plant by). The peanut is a dicot plant belonging to the class Magnoliopsida; plants classified under this class usually have two seed leaves.[3] Peanuts belong to the order Fabales and the family Leguminosae. Many legumes have a cooperative relationship with rhizobodial bacteria in root nodules that convert nitrogen in the air into a form the plants can use (nitrogen fixation).[3] Peanuts are also a member of the sub-family Papilionaceae; plants classified under this sub-family usually have pinnate leaves, irregular flowers, about ten stamens (the pollen producing reproductive organ) and lateral petals.[3] The scientific name for peanuts is A... ... middle of paper ... ...A Subterranean Legume." Wayne's Word. Palomar College Arboretum, 15 Mar. 2009. Web. 24 Jan. 2014. [7] 2005. Peanut Flower and Gynoecium. Waynes Word. By W. P. Armstrong. Palomar College, 15 Mar. 2009. Web. 24 Jan. 2014. [8] 2005. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Waynes Word. By W. P. Armstrong. Palomar College, 15 Mar. 2009. Web. 24 Jan. 2014. [9] 2005. Photograph. Waynes Word. By W. P. Armstrong. Palomar College, 15 Mar. 2009. Web. 24 Jan. 2014. [10] Beasley, John, and John Baldwin. "Peanut Cultivars and Descriptions." The University of Georgia College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences. The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, 09 Apr. 1998. Web. 26 Jan. 2014. [11] Peanuts Make Me Happy. 2009. Photograph. May I Ask You a Question. Wordpress.com, 5 Oct. 2009. Web. 26 Jan. 2014. [12] Peanut Oil. N.d. Photograph. N.p.

More about draft

Open Document