Womens Rights In A Doll's House

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In Henrik Ibsen’s play A Doll’s House there are many themes, but none more important than the main theme of women’s rights. The theme of women’s rights is revolved around the main character Nora, who is subjected to oppression and treated like she is inferior to the men in the play until the end when stands up for herself. Ibsen representation of Nora comes across as the traditional woman during the time period, the Victorian era, in which the play takes place. This projection of Nora’s character is made evident throughout the play, from her actions to the way the other characters act towards her. The way Torvarld and the rest of the characters treat Nora is childlike and stereotypical of how woman were viewed during this time, no one takes…show more content…
“Come, come, my little skylark must not droop her wings. What is this! Is my little squirrel out of temper? (Taking out his purse.) Nora, what do you think I have got here?” (Ibsen 1347). Torvald teases Nora about her spending habits only to offer her more money as a way to appease her, in order to sway her emotional status to his liking. “Ten shillings—a pound—two pounds! Thank you, thank you, Torvald; that will keep me going for a long time.”(Ibsen 1347). By giving Nora money he is, in the eyes of society letting her live up to the expectations of the prototypical woman during that…show more content…
You don’t understand the conditions of the world in which you live.” (Ibsen 1390). Torvald tries to make her second guess her decision by making her think that she isn’t smart enough to know what she’s doing and that she can’t take care of herself. He also uses her wifely duties as a way to guilt trip her into staying “Are they not your sacred duties to your husband and your children?” (Ibsen 1390). Societal view on women back then was narrow-minded, “the traditional view of motherhood was that mothers stayed in the home. In general, they did not pursue careers but dedicated their lives to running households and raising children” (McCaffrey) in the sense that society believed that women’s only sole purpose was to stay at home and be mother and take care of the house, while the men went out and
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