Women's Goals For The Millennium Development Goals

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The Millennium Development Goals were first agreed upon in 2001 by world governments as an initiative to end world poverty, facilitate development, and improve living standards and life chances across the globe within fifteen years. Since that deadline has passed, the goals were revamped and nine new goals have been added with a new target year of 2030. The new goals expand on the original eight to address issues relating to gender equality and the root causes of poverty (Ford). End poverty in all forms everywhere and achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls are two of the 17 proposed millennium development goals that UN member nations want to achieve by 2030. Research from the last two decades has shown a link between gender…show more content…
There is a well-documented positive correlation between education levels and economic success. Women’s education is essential to not only economic development in third world countries but other forms of social development such as improved health and literacy rates in these areas as well. To achieve the Millennium Development Goals, more attention must be paid to women’s education and the role it plays in improving quality of life and in facilitating development in economic and social terms. Investment in human capital is vital to improving quality of life and economic growth and development and according to World Bank data, women make up 50.1 percent of the population the world’s least developed countries. When half the population lacks equal access to education, resources, and capital, how far can development go? A developing country will continue to struggle to achieve economic development on a large scale because they are not fully investing in all their human…show more content…
This leaves children in countries with poor infrastructure susceptible to diseases that developed countries have nearly eradicated like measles, small pox, tetanus, yellow fever, whooping cough, and polio and results in higher child mortality rate. A World Bank report on the relationship between gender and development found that children ages 12-23 months born to mothers with more education in the developing areas were more likely to vaccinated than there less educated counterparts (see figure 1). Education, even at the lowest levels, provides mothers with the knowledge and information necessary to ensure that their children are protected from deadly diseases. The increased vaccination and immunization rates also put less strain on weak health infrastructures in these regions when epidemics occur because more of the population is immune to the
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