Women In Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell To Arms

1745 Words7 Pages
Throughout the ages, man has been swayed by the female influence in their lives. Ernest Hemingway portrayed this through his novels such as “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”, and The Sun Also Rises (Bayum, P.824). In Hemingway’s pre-war life our textbook only mentions the summers they spent together and how they were the settings for most of his writings. Once Hemingway joined the war, came back as a decorated and injured soldier, his views toward his mother had changed. His father, a successful physician, committed suicide, which Hemingway blamed his mother (Bayum, P.824). In a sense, Hemingway did not have a maternal figure in his life. Throughout many of his stories, such as A Farewell to Arms, which presents a female character who is dependent…show more content…
This couple chose to run away from the war together to start their lives, however, this did not end the way they would have liked. The nurse became pregnant and would ultimately pass away while giving birth to their child. This novel was talked negatively about due to his ongoing negative views about women. Numerous of Hemingway’s works portrayed women like this. Works such as Men without Women, and For Whom the Bell Tolls told the audience about women who were submissive to men, which created even more uproar with Hemingway’s novels about the negative views of women. However, Hemingway’s novels began to change and his views in his novels changed after the First World War. In Hemingway’s novels, The Sun Also Rises and For Whom the Bell Tolls, characters such as Brett Ashley and Pilar, display strong and complex roles as figures in these works (Bayum, P. 825). Sexual roles of women were blurred during the world war due to the need for females in the workplace. Upon this new found modernism, Hemingway seemed to change his views through his novels. He seemed to see that males were difficult to live with as well, so it may be a male problem as well as female (Bayum, P. 825). Hemingway saw that sexual conception and how masculinity was perceived, was becoming unclear. Hemingway’s viewpoints grew to be clearer as he wrote more. His hobbies that his father had enjoyed were now…show more content…
This story portrays a writer who is called Harry becomes marooned on a safari somewhere in Africa. This seems to fit Hemingway’s everyday lifestyle due to the safari life and how Harry carries himself while stranded. Much like Hemingway, Harry drinks and insults the female character in his life at the time. During the story, a female Character, Helen is disrespected by Harry during his drinking escapades. Harry states in the story that he “will go on hurting her, it seems to be more amusing” (Bayum, P. 830). This statement along with the statement “that he does not know why he is treating her this way” allows the reader to infer that Harry, much like Hemingway has psychological problems that are taken out on females (Bayum, P. 830). Harry analyses his life and how a female has seemed to ruin it or “waste it”. Hemingway tells the reader that Harry loves her, however once he says nice things to her, then he becomes angry with her again and begins calling her names. Harry seems to be a non-fictional version of Hemingway due to his psychological views on women and how he treats
Open Document