Willy's Misconception of Himself in “Death of a Salesman”

620 Words3 Pages
The play, “Death of a Salesman” written by Arthur Miller, presents Willy Loman, as a salesman, who fails to earn a living and slowly loses his mind. Willy continuously seeks the past to find out where he went wrong. During his years in life, Willy wanted his two sons, Biff and Happy to become someone they’re not; Willy wanted them to become a salesman like him. However, because of his obsession in the American Dream of easy success and wealth, he created a life full of lies for himself and his sons. In the end because of “his misconception of himself as someone capable of greatness” leads to his downfall and the end of his life (Death of a Salesman).” One of the themes used in this play by Arthur Miller is the American Dream of success, fame, and wealth. Furthermore, traditionally, the American Dream should be achieved “through thrift and hard work (Warshauer).” However, due to industrialization during the nineteenth and twentieth century, the American Dream of success, fame, and wealth through hard work was replaced by easy or quick success. The people of America no longer cared ...

More about Willy's Misconception of Himself in “Death of a Salesman”

Open Document