Why the Conflict in Northern Ireland Erupted into Violence in the 1960's and Resulted in Long Term Occupation by the British Army

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Why the Conflict in Northern Ireland Erupted into Violence in the 1960's and Resulted in Long Term Occupation by the British Army There are many reasons why the conflict in Northern Ireland erupted into violence in the 1960s. The violence resulted in long term occupation of Northern Ireland by the British Army. Some of the Key events which caused British occupation were the civil rights movement and the Battle of the Bogside. The failure of partition also contributed to the violence and tensions between the Nationalists and the Unionists. Catholics were being discriminated against because of their religion and their ideas and beliefs in politics. They were classed as 2nd class citizens and were not given the same opportunities as Unionists. This discrimination angered the Catholics. Most jobs were given to Unionists rather than Catholics and in the Belfast shipyards, one of the biggest companies, there was a great majority of Unionists compared to Catholics. There was unfair allocations of council houses, the majority of council houses would be given to Protestants rather than Catholics regardless of the situation that the Catholics were in. This discrimination became so unfair that a sit in was held by MP Austin Currie protesting against a house being allocated to a 19 year old woman, who was not at the top of priority list but was the secretary to member of the UUP. Currie gained publicity from the press and showed the world the sectarian bias that was happening in Northern Ireland at the time. The voting system in Northern Ireland was corrupt. The voting system worked as every house that a man owns counted as 1 vote. This was unfair in the fact that Catholics were so poor, because of the unfair employment of Unionists rather than Catholics, that they owned hardly any houses as a group compared to the Unionists, so the Unionists had an advantage in the votes. Gerry Mandering also took place, the borders of the counties were being moved so there was always a Unionist majority in each area – which again meant the Catholics would

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