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Why Is Barbie A Role Model

analytical Essay
1279 words
1279 words
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Merriam-Webster defines “idol” as “a greatly loved or admired person.” So what exactly does it take to be considered an idol? If the answer includes being a strong role model for young girls and staying relevant for over 50 years, Barbie fits the bill perfectly. Over the years, Barbie dolls have received a lot of criticism in the feminist community, but for what? With an unrealistically tiny waist and idealized looks, she’s almost too perfect. That kind of role model couldn’t be healthy for young girls. These judgements have been made for decades, but it seems that society has lost the true meaning of feminism. Instead of analyzing Barbie’s immense success and drivenness, the critics reduce Barbie to a stereotypical dumb blonde. Despite countless criticisms for her unrealistic body proportions, Barbie has proven time and time again to be a fantastic role model for girls in their perception of gender roles, possible career choices, and physical limitations. Imagining gender roles in the 1950s, one idea probably comes to mind: A man comes home from work, greeted eagerly by his children, and sits down to eat the family dinner his wife has lovingly prepared. Little girls dreamt of one day finding husbands and carrying on this seemingly ancient tradition, until something curious came about. Amidst this period of extremely sexist family values came Barbie, one of the first dolls for girls that didn’t reinforce rigid gender roles. She encouraged girls to “be who they wanna be,” and not only did Barbie verbalize this idea, she practiced what she preached. Throughout her existence, Barbie has held more male-dominant jobs than any real woman ever has, including a doctor, CEO, and even President of the United States. “It can be argued tha... ... middle of paper ... ...irls only perpetuates the cycle of insecurity. Barbie is only as good or bad a role model as society makes her out to be, and the day parents start teaching their children that they shouldn’t take body type into consideration is the day Barbie finally starts being the amazing role model she was meant to be. In essence, Barbie teaches girls not only that their options are endless, but also that it’s very possible to pursue a career and not give up your individual identity. “Through their [her children’s] play Barbara imagined their lives as adults. They used the dolls to reflect the adult world around them. They would sit and carry on conversations, making the dolls real people.” Ruth Handler had big plans for this little doll when she came up with the idea, and has since provided a creative outlet for little girls everywhere to act out their hopes and dreams.

In this essay, the author

  • Defines "idol" as "a greatly loved or admired person." barbie fits the bill perfectly.
  • Analyzes how barbie has received a lot of criticism in the feminist community, but it seems that society has lost the true meaning of feminism.
  • Analyzes how barbie, one of the first dolls for girls that didn't reinforce rigid gender roles, encouraged girls to "be who they wanna be." barbie has held more male-dominant jobs than any real woman ever.
  • Argues that barbie is a vital part of young girls' transition into womanhood, because she provides alternatives to the female stereotypes of mother and wife.
  • Analyzes how barbie breaks free from tradition and covers new ground in the workforce, showing girls that they have countless options.
  • Analyzes how the age-old question "brains or beauty" simplifies an extremely complex subject and teaches today's young girls that they have to choose one or the other and stick with it.
  • Analyzes how barbie eradicates the idea that brains versus beauty is a twisted dichotomy, and young girls could certainly use that kind of positive influence in their lives.
  • Opines that meg cabot's perception of barbie is spot on. she taught us that we could be anything we wanted to be.
  • Opines that eating disorders in today's youth are at an all-time high due to this poisonous way of thinking.
  • Explains that barbie isn't a bad role model because of one fact that is often overlooked- she's molded piece of plastic. insecure adults project their problems onto their children.
  • Explains that invalid criticisms of barbie are more harmful to young girls than the doll itself. parents condition their children to accept a form of body shaming.
  • Argues that the only way to stop body shaming altogether is for society to embrace all people, or dolls for that matter, no matter how they look.
  • Explains that barbie teaches girls that their options are endless and that it's possible to pursue a career and not give up your individual identity. ruth handler had big plans for this little doll when she came up with the idea.
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