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When Insanity is Sane: Hamlet's Duty and Clever Path Taken to Honor His Father and Denmark

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When Insanity is Sane: Hamlet's Duty and Clever Path Taken to Honor His Father and Denmark
Traumatic experiences can cause for a negative impact on one’s emotional, mental, and physical wellbeing. Sometimes, individuals internalize this trauma and harbor feelings of distress which creates deep-rooted issues that need to be addressed. In the play Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, readers are heart broken and intrigued by the events following a great king’s death. The main character and protagonist, Hamlet, is dealing with the his father’s death as he returns home from studying at a university to not only find that his father has been murdered, but his mother remarried to his uncle. Angered by his mother’s betrayal and fathers sudden death, Hamlet sets out to find the one responsible. In his quest, Hamlet is confronted by a ghost who appears to be his father, explaining that it was his uncle who had murdered him. Hamlet quickly decides that he will murder his uncle. A debate ensues of whether or not Hamlet truly became insane or if this was all a perfectly crafted plan designed to trick the people of Denmark. Evidence from the play written by the brilliant Shakespeare, shows that through his duty to his father, his adversion to Claudius, his complicated relationship with women, and his success of his plan, Hamlet’s loss of sanity was part of a clever rouse that he so intelligently created to avenge the most foul and unnatural murder of the great King Hamlet.
Two very popular theories of madness in Shakespeare’s time were demonic possession and lunacy. Hamlet was possessed figuratively, and psychologically, by his father’s warlike spirit. Hamlet's mother Gertrude neglected Hamlet, and so the reader can understand how grave King Hamle...

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...t future or past - so as to avoid getting in trouble. And although it is typically believed that Hamlet was actually just Shakespeare's take on a play created entirely before his time, Elizabethan England did have a significant impact on the writing of Hamlet. In the 17th century, storytelling and current events were rife with the themes of melancholy, insanity, demonic possession, et cetera, especially at the height of the European witch trials. So when the debate of Hamlet's insanity is arisen, it is easy to point to the variables that had the potential to drive him crazy. But his duty to his father, his adversion to Claudius, his complicated relationship with women, and his success of his plan were part of a masterminded plan that Hamlet was obligated to cary out for the good of not hisself, his family, or not even his Father, King Hamlet, but for all of Denmark.
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