preview

What Is Universality And Incontrovertibility Of Human Rights

Good Essays
Human Rights (Universal Declaration) is an inalienable fundamental rights to which a person is inherently entitled to, simply because she/he is a human being. It shows that they are universal because they can apply to everyone and they can be the same rights that each person can be seeking or fighting to get in their life, which brings us to learn more about universality and incontrovertibility of human rights difference. Universality is the assumption that if human rights exist, they necessarily belong to each and every one of us whereas, Incontrovertibility is a way of making a claim which is often closely interwoven with the claim to universality, but is actually quite distinct from it (something that is unchangeable and true). Comparatively,…show more content…
The problem of natural law is the idea of human rights is the idea that all people are part of community that transcends their immediate political community that subscribe to a law that is superior to the law of their state. Cultural differences are the greatest controversy of human rights which is universality and natural law. The hierarchy of rights, universality does not imply incontrovertibility meaning it is one of the things to say that there are fundamental rights which apply to everyone; it is another to say that these rights are absolute, inalienable and incontrovertible. The problem of duties on citizenship rights suggests that there can be no rights without corresponding…show more content…
“Universality does not imply incontrovertibility” because it is a way of saying that there are some fundamental rights that apply to everyone and some that are absolute, inalienable and incontrovertible reluctance to claim that these Human Rights can never be detected, denied or negated in any circumstances in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that are not claimed to be incontrovertible depending on the circumstances because there is not a difficulties on visualizing that there is “a conflict of rights” (O’Byrne, 2003, p.45). For instance, women in Canada were not allowed to vote. Furthermore, the Parliament passed the Wartime Elections Act in 1920 and in 1921, Agnes Macphail was elected and become one of the first women to sit in the House of Commons, but still the right to vote for all women in Canada was not given to them especially Aboriginal and Asians. Until 1960 was when the Federal government gave a full credit or rights to all women in Canada to vote. This shows that the Parliament, Federal or Provincial government rights on racism and discrimination based on the sex, gender and colour of skin. Human Rights was not respected by the higher levels of government in Canada to their citizens for decades and it also shows how the government did not protect the rights of its citizens. Another example that can be related to