What Is The Theme Of Allegory In Dante's Inferno

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Dante’s Dottrina The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri “Inferno” can bring tons of literature culture to the reader. It is full of allegories that sometimes leads the reader to its own interpretation and imagination. Allegory is a way of writing where ideas are defined with characters and events of a story. It could also be said that Allegory is what the reader can perceive from a work of literature. In the Canto IX (61-63), Dante gives a sense of pause in order to call on the attention of the reader as if Dante is speaking directly to the reader himself. “O you possessed of sturdy intellects, observe the teaching that is hidden here beneath the veil of verses so obscure.” (Inf. 9.61-63) These lines has caused a lot of importance among…show more content…
On both occasions, “angelic presences are involved” (Maldelbaum, 359). After the obscure scene, Virgil opens Dante’s eyes to see the aftermath caused by the wind. The monsters were gone and Dante distinguishes a “Heaven’s messenger” walking over the water to whom Virgil suggests they should bow (Inf. 9.73-87). All this may also evoke that Dante wanted to express the power of Heaven. Nothing else that behind the obscure horrifying scene was a Heaven’s messenger, perhaps an angel, fighting against evil. The event was not pretty but terrifying and imposing sort of speak. Dante possibly could have used this allegory to teach the way heaven’s ferocity works against evil and how much it is worthy of…show more content…
These verses are just one of many spectacular passages of the Comedy. Here, Dante was able to cause controversy among readers and putted many to think, analyze, and come up with their interpretations. It could be simply Dante’s geniality to describe his surroundings while blinded with Virgil hands. He set the scenario for the reader to allegorize his words. On the other hand, he probably just wanted to alert the reader about the obscure words nonetheless focus one to “observe the teaching” behind his verses. Another view which illustrates sort of a religious aspect of the scene. There are many interpretations but regardless of how one might perceive these verses, Dante truly leaves a dottrina among the humans that have had the pleasure of reading his Divine
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