What Is Critical Thinking?

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A fundamental element that brings society together can be summarized in one term: ethics. This concept is deep-rooted in each individual’s interaction with others, and themes such as conscience and righteousness are often taught to children from a young age. In order to promote the proper, humane growth of a person, parents and guardians instill moral guidelines into children and students in their beginning years of education. While discipline and judgemental education continue on through one’s youthful years, the notion tapers off during the adolescent age where most assume that ethical judgement becomes common sense. As adults and supervisors no longer preach the importance of doing the right thing, teens in the high school age may become…show more content…
Once again, the author defines critical thinking as “...evaluation. Critical thinking, therefore, may be defined as the process by which we test claims and arguments and determine which have merit and which do not. In other words, critical thinking is a search for answers, a quest. (19)”. The author defines critical thinking as proposing questions and seeking answers, also inspecting arguments and claims that are tied to the issue. Applied to the school curriculum, the course would entail critical thinking and evaluation of judgements and perceptions of acceptable values and conduct towards others. Employing critical thinking and analysis into the class curriculum, students then also grow to become more mature in their decisions as critical thinkers. Various traits of critical thinkers are listed by Ruggiero, where he states that experienced thinkers are honest with themselves and their own limited knowledge, see problems and issues as intellectual challenges, remain patient yet curious, draw conclusions from logic rather than personal emotion, open-minded, and think before acting (21-22). These listed traits are all extremely beneficial to the development of the student’s personalized conscience and would only broaden their internal horizons for understanding their moral…show more content…
Each individual’s ethics and beliefs are founded on their personal lifestyle and opinions. However, opinions are not always correct and acute scrutiny of such serves to classify opinions as unreliable or viable. Ruggiero once again explains how opinions in moral debates are often far more intricate than they seem: “Questions of right and wrong are presumed to be completely subjective and personal. According to this notion, if you believe a particular behavior is immoral and I believe it is moral, even noble, we are both right. Your view is “right for you” and mine is “right for me.” This popular perspective may seem eminently sensible and broadminded, but it is utterly shallow. Almost every day, situations arise that require reasonable people to violate it. (61-62)”. Following this statement, numerous examples of scenarios are given, such as how pedophilia is against the law, yet the accused may believe that their acts are moral in their own standards. Morality and ethics are a gray area in which standards vary for each individual. Some are more problematic than others, but in a class where ideas among peers are shared and discussed, students will able to make sound judgement and draw their own conclusions in what most believe to be the correct ethical
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