What Are Gender Roles?

1172 Words5 Pages
In the societies’ that we reside in gender roles are bound are learned people and most of the time these rules are normalized and taken into considerations while relating something to the genders. Organ donations are no exception. The clear-cut distinction between men and women is based from the gender roles that the society abides by. In their book, Gender Roles, Faye Belgrave and Amie Ashcraft, the idea that previously held ideas about genders separates both genders in societies. In the chapter, “Gender Identity Development in Urban African American girls,” they say, “It is through our gender socialization, we learn to differentiate men and women and the behavior expected of them, to expect gender role preferences appropriate to our own biological…show more content…
The study succeeds in showing that the women were more altruistic than men. What isn’t mentioned in the study is that the reason for that. According to the society, women are supposed to have a “warm heart.” They are supposed to be the feminine and the kind hearted one as opposed to the men being the masculine type. Women are scrutinized if they show any indifference to the topic of donations, which is not the same for men. The chapter mentions the notion that men are held in a higher standard because they don’t display feminine feelings such as compassion and nurturance (Belgrave, Ashcraft 6). Gender discrimination is displayed here as well. Just because someone feels a certain way, that doesn’t give anybody the right hold him or her under such standards. Also, not all men will be “masculine.” How will they be classified as? This classifications once again are only restricting people. There will be no room for improvement if they are supposed to be a certain way. One example of how one sex has less advantage in the context of science and…show more content…
This doesn’t set well with the society. Society wants the woman to wait until they’re sure and have no other choice. The reason for this is most likely the notion that a woman’s reproductive organs reflect her “womanhood.” Gwen Brown, professor of communication from Radford University, does a book review on Taking Sex Differences Seriously by Steven E. Rhoads. In her review, Brown says, Rhoads discussion on the defense of sex differences derails when it is related to the different characteristics and behaviors people have such that not all women think of following a traditional pattern or assuming a traditional rule set by the society (Brown 87). That is one of the biggest issues when defending anything to do with gender roles. The assumed roles of people in a cultural origin are not creating an environment where there is the ability to move forward. Not everybody is going to have the opportunity to break out of these shells no matter how hard they try. Instead of trying to change and modify the “guidelines” there should a case where gender roles will not be the first thing that a person is defined
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