War Explored in Literature

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War Explored in The Crucible by Arthur Miller, “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin, and Leap to Freedom by Kasenkina

“Now every road and highway…was littered with the corpses of human beings and animals…the wounded were left to die. Children ran frantically, shrieking for their mothers…there was no food, water, soap, or medical supplies. Like polluted waters became carriers of disease (Kasenkina 93).” This is a typical scene of war demonstrated in literary works. In literature war is a very common, yet important subject and it is generally demonstrated in plays, short stories, and novels. Some of the pieces of literature in where war is shown include: The Crucible by Arthur Miller, “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin, and Leap to Freedom by Kasenkina. In these pieces of literature war is shown as a horrid event that always has both physically and psychologically bad outcomes. In many literary works including the ones mentioned above the good outcomes in war are misrepresented and suppressed by the bad outcomes in war.

To Begin, In The Crucible by Arthur Miller there was a war within neighbors. This literary work highly demonstrated both the physically and psychologically harsh outcomes while the good outcomes were subdued. “…Think on it now, it’s a deep thing, and dark as a pit (Kinsella 1251). In this statement Giles was talking about how people are not getting along and are accusing each other of witchcraft. This is an introduction to the harsh physical outcome because people are tortured till they confess of being involved in witchcraft even if they aren’t. Then, if they are “proven” to be witches but, ...

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...he good outcomes of war and stop portraying war as a horrible event because war brings about many great qualities from people by either making them fight for what they believe is right or just making them learn more about other people and themselves.

Works Cited

Kasenkina, Oksana Stepanovna. Leap to Freedom. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1949. Print.

Kinsella, Kate et.al. The Crucible. Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2002. 1233-334. Print.

Kinsella, Kate et.al. "The Minister's Black Veil." Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2002. 336-48. Print.

Kinsella, Kate et.al. "The Story of an Hour." Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2002. 634-38. Print.
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