Verbal Intertextuality

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One of the most common ways to enhance suspense is the use of words with cataphoric semantic elements. Cataphora is a trope, which refers to early cues within the narrative, while the opposite trope anaphora means the recall of these clues (cf. Shaul 2012, 39). Cataphora refers to the subsequent information in the text. The subsequent information are cohesive relationships to advance one (Wulff 1996, 2-3). Cataphora helps to create dramatic effect and it builds suspense by keeping the reader to wait for the outcome (Donnelly 1994, 100). Donnelly (1994, 100) notes that generic terms, which start high up the ladder and work to more specific names build suspense e.g. personal pronouns (I, we, you, she), relative pronouns (that, which), demonstrative…show more content…
These are as follows: intertextuality, free indirect discourse, metanarration, internal monologue, digression (cf. Fill 2003a, 272; Fill 2003b, 22). Intertextuality refers to the interdependence between literary texts (Cuddon and Preston 1999, 424). Intertextuality can be made up of variety of functions such as quatations, plagiarisms, and allusions (Genette 1997b, XVIII). Every intertextual reference is a deviation from the usual text. Intertextual reference draws the attention of the reader in one direction, which is outside the prior reading direction and thus it initiates in reader the experience of suspense, which motivates him to process the intertextual reference in order to resume the original reading order (Sánchez Penzo 2010,…show more content…
the additional text that surrounds the main text within the book (peritext) and outside the book (epitext). Paratextuality invloves such elements as titles, subtitles, pseaudonyms, forewords, dedications, epigraphs, headings, prefaces, acknowledgements, footnotes, illustrations, and etc. Epitextual elements are authorial correspondences, oral confidences, diaries, pre-texts, etc. (Genette 1997b, XVIII). Metatextuality refers to the relationship that “unites a given text to another, of which it speaks without necessarily citing it (without summoning it), in fact sometimes even without naming it” (Genette 1997a, 4). Genette identifies metatext as commentary on other text (Genette 1997b, XIX). Architextuality denotes “the entire set of general or transcendental categories – types of discourse, modes of enunciation, literary genres – from which emerges a singular text.” (Genette 1997a, 1). Architextuality is “the most abstract and implicit of the transcendent categories, the relationship of inclusion linking each text to the various kinds of discourse of which it is a representative” (Genette 1997b, XIX). Hypertextuality denotes “any relationship uniting a text B (hypertext) to an earlier text a (hypotext), upon which it is grafted in a manner that is not that of commentary” (Genette, 1997a,
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