Vampirism: Reality or Strictly Fantasy?

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Vampirism is not an author’s imagination, or terminology, but for some category of people; it is a life dogma and path they willfully and viciously want to follow. According to Foster, vampirism is about selfishness, and denying other people’s rights to live in order to meet one’s own demands. The unusual vampirism, through the detailed description, complex syntax, and unusual diction, demonstrates the destructive consequences of violence on human beings leading the lives of the victims as well as their families to be shed into pieces. Mr. Harvey’s vampirism in The Lovely Bones distorts the Salmons’ persistence as well as their inability to accept the reality of Susie’s murder. Mr. Harvey brutally raped and then murdered Susie Salmon in the most violent and indescribable way. “ He felt thoughts of me…my muffled scream…The glorious white flesh that had never seen the sun…then split, so perfectly with the blade of his knife…”(Sebold 50). Through the use of detailed description, it is evident how Harvey splits Susie’s body with his knife as his own way of finding pleasure in killing her violently, and in enjoying the painful sounds of his victim. Also, the serial killer has mastered all the violent variety methods of killing. “Violence…the specific injury…cause characters to visit on another or on themselves…shootings, stabbings …”(Foster 89). Apparently, Harvey has learnt not only to inflict pain on his victims, but to take pleasures in his violent killing methods. Nevertheless, Harvey’s violent act of murder caused great sorrow for the Salmons, and led to their entire denial of Susie’s death. Even after finding the elbow of Susie, the Salmons are willfully ignoring the reality of her death so that they can clin... ... middle of paper ... ...essed” (Line18-20). The phrase “ill spirit it possessed” symbolizes the body’s lustful and evil desires, which only leads to the soul’s ailment and eventually, destruction. Nevertheless, the body complains of being entrapped by the “bonds of this tyrannic soul” (Line 12). By identifying the soul as “tyrannical” Marvell coveys how the soul’s morality and conscience cause difficulty and complexity to individuals when it resists their egotistical desires. Although the soul encounters the body’s vehement outbreaks with love and hope; mistakenly, the body considers such love as psychological sufferings inflicted by soul. As it is presented here, vampirism is not a product of art, it is a path followed by every selfish and powerful one who misuse his powers on the account of others’ happiness. It is the moto of the outcast and those who are deprived of the good nature.

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