Use Of Satire In Mark Twain's Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

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A Weapon of Mass Exploitation "Satire is traditionally the weapon of the powerless against the powerful" (Molly Ivins). In Mark Twain 's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, his use of satire prevails throughout the novel in order to bring awareness to the faults of certain social institutions. Twain 's novel is fully loaded with ammunition and serves as a powerful weapon capable of mass exploitation. Just like Twain 's use of satire prevails throughout his novel, social institutions prevail throughout our everyday lives, individually shaping and molding our own behavioral structures as displayed in Huckleberry Finn. Character development and behavior in the novel is propelled by several different social institutions in which Mark pokes fun…show more content…
People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite" (Nelson Mandela). Throughout Huckleberry Finn, Twain also makes jabs at racism and the role it plays on molding the beliefs and actions of certain characters. "When they told me there was a state in this country where they 'd let that nigger vote, I drawed out. I says I 'll never vote ag 'in. (...) Why ain 't this nigger put up at auction and sold?" (Twain 37-38). Unfortunately, Huck 's beliefs have been molded by his poor excuse of a father who displays a significant amount of racism. "Well, he was right; he was most always right; he had an uncommon level head for a nigger" (Twain 87). This quote is a prime example of just how clouded Huck 's judgement is, showing that he does not believe an African American is up to the intellectual ability of the white man. What Mark is trying to get at through his criticism of racism is that a person is not defined by their race or the color of their skin, those are not valid factors in determining the ability of any…show more content…
"Well, by and by somebody said Sherburn ought to be lynched. In about a minute everybody was saying it; so away they went, mad and yelling, and snatching down every clothes line they come to to do the hanging with" (Twain 155). In this scene, Huck witnesses the murder of a disorderly drunken man, Boggs, and a member of the crowd suggesting they hang Sherburn, the man who had shot him. Sprung by the heat of the moment, the crowd latches on to that idea in a nonsensible manner and fails to realize what exactly they are doing. Sherburn then confronts the crowd with a double-barrel gun and calls them out for being cowards that will not dare to lynch him in broad daylight. His lengthy speech on the nature of humans and the cowardice of every person in the crowd is exposed, leading them to disperse and carry on with their lives. Twain 's criticism reveals that when people are in large groups, there is a greater chance that they will adopt the behaviors of their peers, as the crowd had done so comically against Sherburn. Twain is also trying to get across the point that if you have no real intention on hurting someone or taking action against them, there is no point in causing all the
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