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Universal Health Care in America

opinionated Essay
1224 words
1224 words
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In recent years, the number of Americans who are uninsured has reached over 45 million citizens, with millions more who only have the very basic of insurance, effectively under insured. With the growing budget cuts to medicaid and the decreasing amount of employers cutting back on their health insurance options, more and more americans are put into positions with poor health care or no access to it at all. At the heart of the issue stems two roots, one concerning the morality of universal health care and the other concerning the economic effects. Many believe that health care reform at a national level is impossible or impractical, and so for too long now our citizens have stood by as our flawed health-care system has transformed into an unfixable mess. The good that universal healthcare would bring to our nation far outweighs the bad, however, so, sooner rather than later, it is important for us to strive towards a society where all people have access to healthcare. Until Obama-care, The United States was one of the only developed nations that did not provide some sort of health care for its citizens. To most other nations that do provide healthcare, it is because it is considered a human right that all people should be entitled to. That hasn’t been the case in America, however, where only those who could afford it could have healthcare plans. Those who stand to gain the most from universal healthcare are the already mentioned 45 million americans who currently don’t have any form of healthcare. For many of these individuals, there are many obstacles that prevent them from gaining healthcare. 80% of the 45 million are working class citizens, but either their employer doesn’t offer insurance, or they do but the individual can n... ... middle of paper ... ...ral, and social benefits to be reaped, and so it is important for our government to continue down this path its started and also important for Americans to provide our full support. There is much to overcome to completely reverse the direction of the health system, and I’m sure it will take many years for the results to pay off, but I’m glad we’ve at least provided the groundwork for future generations to build on. Work Cited Himmelstein, D. et al. “Illness and Injury as Contributors to Bankruptcy.” Health Affairs (Millwood), February 2, 2005. Institute of Medicine. “Health Insurance is a Family Matter”, 2002. Associated Press. “GM to slash jobs, close more plants.” Available at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8129876/from/RL.2/, accessed December 2005. Institute of Medicine. “A Shared Destiny: Community Effects of Uninsurance”, 2002.

In this essay, the author

  • Argues that the morality of universal health care and the economic effects of it are at the heart of the issue.
  • Opines that the 45 million americans who currently don't have any form of healthcare are most likely to benefit from universal healthcare.
  • Explains that even those employed with health benefits can still be majorly affected. in a survey of individuals who declared bankruptcy, 46% listed hospital and medical bills as their main factor for doing so.
  • Analyzes the economic effects of universal healthcare on the uninsured, and argues that it would lead to better productivity and better standards of living.
  • Explains that dr thorp of emory published a study detailing the potential government expenses for implementing standardized health care. each scenario would save anywhere from $320 billion to $1.1 trillion over ten years if applied.
  • Opines that if health care were provided free, many americans would have freedom to make decisions without worrying about whether or not they’ll have health insurance for them and their families.
  • Opines that our current health care system needs to be revamped in order to meet our growing needs.
  • Opines that the government has taken steps towards a health system overhaul, but skeptics still argue against it, citing the costs as too much or that it's un-american.
  • Cites immelstein, d. et al., "illness and injury as contributors to bankruptcy".
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