preview

U.S. Free Trade with China

opinionated Essay
2457 words
2457 words
bookmark

U.S. Free Trade with China

Sino-American relations have always been characterized as complex and

tumultuous. Presently, the United States must reach a decision that would drastically

affect the politics, environments, militaries, technology, and most importantly the

economies of both nations. This problem the United States must face is whether it ought

to allow China's entry into the World Trade Organization. There is much hesitation in

taking such steps as American protectionists are weary of a nation whose expanding

economy could further "Chinese influence in American politics as a result of Donorgate;

continued doubts about Beijing's dismal human rights record; and worries about the U.S.

trade imbalance with China- $40 billion and growing." (Shribman 44) Yet there are also

many benefits to free trade which outweigh the negative. Sino-American free trade will

boost US sales to the world's most populous nation, while building diplomatic relations,

and ultimately liberalizing China both politically and socially. (Christian Science Monitor

98)

China, a country in East Asia, is the world's third largest country by area

(after Russia and Canada) and the largest by population. China's most populous city is

its capital, Beijing. Officially People's Republic of China, it is bounded on the north by

the Republic of Mongolia and Russia; on the northeast by Russia and North Korea; on

the east by the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea; on the south by the South China Sea,

Vietnam, Laos, Burma (Myanmar), India, Bhutan, and Nepal; on the west by Pakistan,

Afghanistan, and Tajikistan; and on the northwest by Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan. China

includes more than 3400 offshore islands, of which Hainan, in the S...

... middle of paper ...

...Offer From China We Shouldn't Refuse" Business Week, April 26,

1999, p120.

Shribman, David. "Going to the Brink Over Trade" Fortune. June 9, 1997, p44-45.

Weidenbaum, Murray. "The Future of Sino-American Relations" Orbis. Spring 1999,

p223-236.

-------------------. "Zhu--No Innocent Abroad" Christian Science Monitor. April 16,

1999, p10.

Bibliography:

Works Cited

Butler, C. Orton. "China" Encarta 1996. (Encyclopedia on CD ROM).

-------------------. "An Offer From China We Shouldn't Refuse" Business Week, April 26,

1999, p120.

Shribman, David. "Going to the Brink Over Trade" Fortune. June 9, 1997, p44-45.

Weidenbaum, Murray. "The Future of Sino-American Relations" Orbis. Spring 1999,

p223-236.

-------------------. "Zhu--No Innocent Abroad" Christian Science Monitor. April 16,

1999, p10.

In this essay, the author

  • Opines that the united states must face the problem of whether it ought to.
  • Explains the historical and political evolution of china as it emerged from china.
  • Explains that chinese history; in a remarkably short period of time radical changes were effected in both china and china.
  • Explains the feudal system where land was concentrated in the hands of a relatively small group of people.
  • Explains that japan, which tried to attach china to its east asia co-prosperity sphere, was able to accomplish this.
  • Describes the benefits of introducing an agrarian program based on the control of rent in large rural areas.
  • States that mainland for the first time since the end of the imperial period in 1912.
  • Explains that the regime initiated the great leap in 1958.
  • Narrates how they ran into problems again after a period of readjustment.
  • Explains that china's leaders began to boost up the economy with a fifth five-year program.
  • Argues that science and technology by the end of the century so that the economy can take its place in
  • Explains that more programs and plans were put into effect, such as one in the united states.
  • Analyzes how one can correlate a weak economy with china's politics.
  • Opines that william shakespeare could be just as great a threat as any or as shakespeare.
  • Describes factories who are members of the communist party. the ruling class made up of factories.
  • Opines that a curtailment of china's growth rate would delay the achievement of the goal.
  • Describes the status of the state, which is slowly emerging from its isolationist position and opening up its wings to the public.
  • Describes key international bodies such as the world trade organization (wto).
  • Opines that the us must pay careful attention to the state's export market and secondly, for this to happen.
  • Opines that the initial impacts of such a new scenario would likely be negative for growth annually.
  • Opines that a lower u.s. export rate would affect most machinery.
  • Explains that companies can trade with the outside world and which foreigners can commerce with china.
  • Explains the strict communist rule revolving around state-run operations.
  • Opines that zhu rongji has attempted to broaden us access to chinese markets.
  • Opines that chinese companies would be able to do business through china.
  • Opines that it is time the united states of america and china end this trade war.
  • Opines that with patience and diplomacy, both nations should sit down and negotiate.
  • Explains that beijing is the people's republic of china, bounded on the north by mongolia and russia, the northeast by russia and north korea, and the east by the yellow sea and east china sea.
  • Explains that hainan, in the south china sea, is by far the largest island in china.
  • Opines that there has been opposition from the far right to labor unions to any such association with a nation that is "suspected of pirating us
  • Describes the advantages of free trade, such as the influence western culture will have over china, to liberalize this nation.
  • Opines that the pla could mobilize its forces in a sub-systemic attempt to keep any political or social uprisings from occurring.
  • Explains that china is the most populous nation in the world, giving it great purchasing power, and its economy is more than half as large as that of the u.s.
  • Analyzes how weidenbaum explores the problems that may arise out of such a situation.
  • Concludes that the us should allow china to join the world trade organization with the rise of the chinese economy.
Get Access