Thomas Jefferson's Presidency

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Essay 2: The third president of the United States was unique in many ways. Unlike his predecessor, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson served two consecutive terms as President, and rather successfully. Thomas Jefferson’s presidency was filled with many successes, even if they were just by chance, and he avoided many of the pitfalls that undid Adams. Though he came to power surrounded by controversy, he left the country improved and it can be said his presidency was very successful. One of the moves that set Jefferson’s presidency for success was how he did not fire all of Adams’s cabinet. Unlike what many people feared, Jefferson becoming the president did not mean a complete upheaval of the government. Instead, Jefferson actually adopted many…show more content…
He started by adopting the good of Adam’s previous cabinet and his policies and building off the foundation he was given. He greatly expanded the nation as well, and used good judgment when spending beyond what Congress had approved. He also made a good decision with engaging the Barbary pirate, which showed the power the new American navy could muster when it needed to defend its liberties. President Jefferson, despite being somewhat disliked, was very successful in his…show more content…
Unlike the Federalist, the Jeffersonian-Republicans were large proponents of state’s rights and the rights of individuals. They firmly believed in preserving the freedoms of the people by letting the people retain powers. In preserving the rights of the states, they were conflicted with many of the policies of the Federalists, who wanted a strong central government. This included the idea of a central bank for the entire nation. With a strong central government, the Jeffersonian-Republicans felt that the rich were retaining to much control of the country, not the average American. Thus, they were often seen as the protectors of the lower classes, such as the immigrants and the farmers. This split in classes resulted in a split regionally in the nation, with the Jeffersonian-Republicans receiving most of their support in the South and the West of the nation, as opposed to the Federalists, who were supported in New
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