preview

Thomas Jefferson´s Gardening Compared to Today

opinionated Essay
1419 words
1419 words
bookmark

Thomas Jefferson’s Gardening Compared to Today Thomas Jefferson one of our founding fathers was very interested in gardening and learning about the soil and land conditions. It has been written that he has grown over 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs and even over a hundred different kinds of fruits. “America's third president Thomas Jefferson was a man of many talents. He wrote the Declaration of Independence. He was a skilled architect, scientist, landscape designer, farmer and life-long gardener. As a young man, Jefferson inherited his family's 2,000 hectare plantation on Monticello Mountain near Charlottesville, Virginia where he designed the neo-classical house and flower gardens and planted grain fields, fruit orchards and vineyards. (Skirble)” “Jefferson's Monticello garden was a Revolutionary American garden. One wonders if anyone else had ever before assembled such a collection of vegetable novelties, culled from virtually every western culture known at the time, then disseminated by Jefferson with the persistence of a religious reformer, a seedy evangelist. Here grew the earth's melting pot of immigrant vegetables: an Ellis Island of introductions, the whole world of hardy economic plants: 330 varieties of eighty-nine species of vegetables and herbs, 170 varieties of the finest fruit varieties known at the time. The Jefferson legacy supporting small farmers, vegetable cuisine, and sustainable agriculture is poignantly topical today. (Hatch)” “Aside from its diverse population of mostly introduced crops, the Monticello garden was American in its size and scope, experimental character, and expansive visual sweep. 600,000 cubic feet of Piedmont red clay was moved with a cart and mule to create the "hanging garden," an... ... middle of paper ... ...led an average of 1,518 miles (about 2,400 kilometers). By contrast, locally sourced food traveled an average of just 44.6 miles (72 kilometers) to Iowa markets. (DeWeerdt)” This is not only bad for the environment with all the food being transported all around the world causing pollution, it also does not support the local growing gardeners. When people buy locally grown produce it helps the community out because of the taxes made from the produce they buy. So without our founding fathers impact on learning how to grow crops and experimenting with the seeds to see how well they grow in certain areas. We would probably not be here today. With Thomas Jefferson’s notes he had taken on his gardening, I am sure people have learned information. And as time has past we need to be very careful how we treat our own land and soil with respect as our forefathers have done.

In this essay, the author

  • Compares thomas jefferson's gardening to today. he was a skilled architect, scientist, landscape designer, farmer, and life-long gardener.
  • Opines that jefferson's monticello garden was a revolutionary american garden. the jefferson legacy supporting small farmers, vegetable cuisine, and sustainable agriculture is poignant today.
  • Explains that the monticello garden was american in its size and scope, experimental character, and expansive visual sweep.
  • Explains that peter hatch is the director of gardens and grounds at monticello and says the garden is laid out as jefferson had planned it, in 24 squares of herbs and vegetables.
  • Explains that jefferson didn't use hothouses or radiant walls to coax vegetables to grow beyond their natural season. he believed pests were inevitable and fertilized soil was the best defense.
  • Explains that thomas jefferson enjoyed gardening into his old age, gathering seeds from all over the world, and planting his crops before his neighbors as a friendly rivalry. food is important as the times have changed the way to garden.
  • Explains that people can buy seeds to plant for themselves to raise, or even go to the grocery store and buy vegetables ready to eat. a person can even choose many varieties of flowers already grown.
  • Analyzes how thomas jefferson's interest in gardening made an impact on writing the u.s. constitution.
  • Opines that jefferson and madison would have liked rooftop farming and urban gardening as ways for people to connect with the soil.
  • Explains that food travels 1,500 miles on average from farm to consumer in the united states, according to rich pirog, the associate director of the leopold center for sustainable agriculture.
  • Opines that without our founding fathers impact on learning how to grow crops and experimenting with the seeds to see how well they grow in certain areas, we would probably not be here today.
Get Access