Theories Of Multiple Intelligences

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Howard Gardner and Multiple Intelligences Kelsey K. Akita Dixie State University Introduction to Early Childhood Education Howard Gardner and Multiple Intelligences Howard Gardner, a professor of human development at the Harvard Graduate School of Education described human cognitive competence as sets of abilities, talents, or mental skills, also called intelligences. He believed that all individuals possess each of these skills to some extent. However, every individual differs in the degree of skill and the nature of their combination (73-74). Howard Gardner is best known for his theory of Multiple Intelligences which proposed that there are several different kinds of intelligences rather than just one. He emphasized that…show more content…
There are eight basic different intelligences: musical, body-kinesthetic, logical-mathematical, linguistic, spatial, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalist. According to Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences, people have many different ways of learning. Unlike traditional theories of intelligence that focus on one, single general intelligence, Gardner believed that people have multiple ways of thinking…show more content…
Musical intelligence is the capacity to think in music, to be able to hear patterns, recognize, and then remember them. Certain parts of the brain help in the perception and production of music. Body-kinesthetic intelligence is the capacity to use parts or all of your body to solve a problem or make something. As bodily movements become specialized over time, it is an obvious advantage, as seen in sports, dance, or acting. Logical-mathematical intelligence is the capacity to think in a logical, often linear pattern and to understand principles of a system. Scientists and mathematicians often think this way, and standardized tests often assess this. Linguistics intelligence is the capacity to use language to express your thoughts, ideas, feelings, and the ability to understand other people and their words. The gift of language is universal, as evidenced by poets and writers as well as speakers and lawyers. Spatial intelligence is the capacity to represent the world internally in spatial terms. Spatial problem-solving is required for navigation, in the use of maps, and when relying on drawings to build something. Playing games such as chess and all the visual arts – painting, sculpting, drawing – use spatial intelligence, and sciences such as anatomy, architecture, and engineering emphasize this intelligence. Interpersonal intelligence is the capacity to understand other people. Master players in a nursery school notice
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