Themes Of The American Dream In The Great Gatsby

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F. Scott Fitzgerald penned The Great Gatsby in the midst of the Roarin’ Twenties. It was a period of cultural explosion, rags-to-riches histories, and a significant shift in the ideals of the American Dream. Fitzgerald’s characters all aspired to fill an American Dream of sorts, though their dreams weren’t the conventional ones. In the novel, the American Dream did a sort of one-eighty. Instead of looking west, people went east to New York in hopes of achieving wealth. The original principals of the Dream faded away, in their place, amorality and corruption. The fulfillment of one’s own American Dream is often marked by corruption, dishonesty, and hope. The original American Dream had nothing to do with achieving wealth, but had everything…show more content…
Gatsby had been working for so long to make Daisy his, that somewhere along the way his love turned to obsession. His Dream is not the pure thing it started out to be. His first step in fulfilling it was to become wealthy, which he did through corrupt means. He was filled with hope that once Daisy saw his wealth and how much he still loved her, that she would leave her husband Tom and come be with him. He even “bought that house so that Daisy would be just across the bay” (Fitzgerald 83). In an attempt to make this come true, he and Daisy began to have an affair. The amorality and dishonesty of this only solidifies the fact that Gatsby’s dream was corrupted by his desire to have Daisy, as if she were an object not a person. Gatsby also never took into account that Daisy may have already fulfilled her dream. She was, even throughout her affair with Gatsby, content with her life with Tom because he gave her the life of luxury she had always dreamed of. Daisy’s dream was corrupt from the beginning. Her desire for money won over her desire for love. As for Gatsby’s dream with Daisy, “it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city…” (Fitzgerald
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