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Theme Of Oppression In The Crucible

analytical Essay
1020 words
1020 words
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Oppression; an extended treatment of cruelty or injustice towards an individual or a group of people. If looked for, it can be found in every society expressed in a number of different ways. Arthur Miller, the author of The Crucible, puts it in a way that is easy to understand. "It is still impossible for man to organize his social life without repressions." This is evident in his play, The Crucible, demonstrating that within a society, oppression will always be present due to personal motives, disputes and misuses of power, as well as distorted religious beliefs. Personal motive is visible in two specific situations as a cause of oppression, involving Abigail as well as the Putnams. Abigail Williams, a young woman, is one of the oppressors …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that oppression can be found in every society expressed in a number of different ways. arthur miller's play, the crucible, demonstrates that within society, it will always be present due to personal motives, disputes, misuses of power, and distorted religious beliefs.
  • Analyzes how personal motive is visible in two specific situations as a cause of oppression, involving abigail and the putnams.
  • Explains that thomas putnam's man for the salem ministry was bayley. the nurse clan had been in the faction that prevented her taking office. edward and jonathan putnam signed the first complaint against rebecca.
  • Explains how the putnam family oppressed rebecca nurse when she was rejected as minister of salem and when there was conflict between the two families over land.
  • Analyzes how parris, as the minister of salem, asserts that the church will burn like hell if they don't obey him. danforth orders the arrest of the 91 residents who vouch for elizabeth proctor.
  • Analyzes how parris, a strong influence in the oppression that salem is facing, is also guilty of this act.
  • Analyzes how arthur miller expresses the concept of oppression being present in every society through the characters of the crucible. personal motives, disputes, misuses of power, and distorted religious beliefs are the roots of the maltreatment in salem.

When Beth begins to scream loudly, Putnam is quick to state that she is bewitched while the doctor states that she is ill, and cannot bear loud noises from the church. Putnam affirms: "The Psalm! She cannot bear to hear the Lord 's name… That is a notorious sign of witchcraft!" (Miller 30) Which is responded with: "There is hard sickness here… so please to keep the quiet." (Miller 31). This, and other examples, show that societies will attribute their own ideas as absolute truth inside of religion. By doing this, oppression is created with the justification of religion, when in fact the origin of these understandings often have nothing to do with religion. Parris, a strong influence in the oppression that Salem is facing, is also guilty of this act. His constant oppression, especially towards John Proctor, has some base in distorted religious beliefs. Parris attempts to defend the accusation being made towards the woman by saying: "Cain were an upright man, and yet he did kill Abel." (Miller 95). Proctor replies with: "Aye, God tells us that. But who tells us Rebecca Nurse murdered seven babies by sending out her spirit on them?" (Miller 95). John Proctor plainly affirms that the accusations being made should not be considered absolute truth, and that defending them with religion, as was being done, is incorrect. The belief that any accusation made by one of the girls was inside religion was misguided and oppressive, notably to the victims of the accusations. Arthur Miller expresses the concept of oppression being present in every society through the characters of The Crucible. "It is still impossible for man to organize his social life without repressions." As discussed, personal motives, disputes and misuses of power, as well as distorted religious beliefs are the roots of the maltreatment in Salem. Miller’s statement and message is valid and applicable in every society, and for every

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