Theme Of Isolation In The Tempest

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Discovery can provoke new thoughts and ideas, transforming the individual through a confronting experience. William Shakespeare's 1610-11 play, 'The Tempest' follows the interconnecting stories of Prospero and his daughter, Miranda, who were banished to an island and stripped of their royal titles. The Tempest, a mighty storm caused by Prospero's spirit Ariel, caused Prospero's family to be shipwrecked on the shores of the island and encounter the brother they once betrayed, leading to a fast-paced story of romance, betrayal and magic. Kathryn Stockett's controversial novel, 'The Help', published in 2009 follows the lives of Aibileen and Minny, two African-American maids, and Skeeter, a young, Caucasian, Southern girl, as they struggle to express…show more content…
In a discriminatory society, the separation of the races is incredibly important to maintaining the social status of the white people and subduing the African-American population, however when one individual, Skeeter Phelan, speaks out against the racist behaviours upon her discovery of the Jim Crows Laws booklet, ' I read through four of the twenty-five pages, mesmerized by how many laws exist to separate us,' she isolates herself in an attempt to do the right thing by her moral and ethical standards. When she highlights the racial issue being brought up by Hilly Holbrook, stating, 'Maybe we ought to just build you a bathroom outside, Hilly,' her Caucasian friend threatens to throw her out of the league, responding, ' I don’t think you ought to be joking around about the colored situation. Not if you want to stay on as editor of the League, Skeeter Phelan.” The warning tone and referral to the 'coloured situation' symbolises society's approach to individuals seeking to rectify the discriminatory differences between the white and coloured population, and as such, society's willingness to isolate individuals who place such practices at risk. Skeeter's discovery of the Jim Crow's Law booklets and further understanding of how the coloured maids are actually treated and alienated within the community catalyses her isolation from those who were…show more content…
In 'The Help', Skeeter's relationship with her mother throughout the beginning of the book is secretive and silent, the two leading separate lives, with the occasional bickering and motherly concern of her appearance and reputation within society. As the novel progresses, Skeeter forces her mother to reveal the story of how her beloved maid was fired, a story Skeeter was ignorant and sheltered of until this point. The disgust she has of her mother after she shares the awful details is evident in Skeeter's recount, 'I let my head sink into my hands. There is no redeeming piece of the story. A child should never know this about her own mother.' The contrast between 'child/mother' accentuates her loss of innocence as a consequence of her discovery, the metaphorical 'sink into my hands', displaying the strong grief and sadness that she is experiencing as a result of her discovery and the destruction of her naivety. However to challenge the perception of discovery and experience of losing one's innocence, Miranda's first meeting with Ferdinand conveys how Shakespeare has contradicted Stockett by portraying a positive loss of innocence and naivety as a result of their romantic discovery. Miranda confesses, 'A thing divine, for nothing natural I ever saw so noble' while Ferdinand sees Miranda and announces, 'O you wonder!', both conveying that they have lost their romantic innocence and
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