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Theme Of Conformity In The Crucible

analytical Essay
1087 words
1087 words
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Arthur Miller’s 1953 play The Crucible and Alfonso Cuarón’s 2006 dystopian science-fiction film Children of Men both represent people and politics through an exploration of the concept of justice and conformity and non-conformity. Both texts represent people and politics in a unique and evocative way through their differing textual forms, contexts and techniques. In The Crucible, the mass hysteria surrounding the witch trials caused paranoia amongst the people of Salem. Miller uses the Salem Witch Trials of 1692 as a symbol and allegory of the fear surrounding the spread of communism during the 1950s in America. The community’s sense of justice was blinded by the mass hysteria and for some, a desire for vengeance and personal gain. The Putnams …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Analyzes how arthur miller's the crucible and alfonso cuarón’s 2006 dystopian science-fiction film children of men represent people and politics in a unique and evocative way through their differing textual forms, contexts and techniques.
  • Analyzes how miller uses the salem witch trials as a symbol and allegory of the fear surrounding the spread of communism during the 1950s in america.
  • Analyzes how cuarón represents people and politics through an exploration of justice in a dystopian society.
  • Analyzes how miller represents people and politics through an exploration of conformity and non-conformity in the crucible.
  • Analyzes how cuarón represents people and politics through an exploration of conformity and non-conformity in a dystopian context.
  • Concludes that miller's the crucible and cuarón’s children of men represent people and politics in a unique and evocative way.

In the play, Puritanism and their beliefs and values ruled Salem. Puritanism are a close community that follow a strict set of rules; there is little freedom for individuals. Individuals who are independent or do not conform to their values are immediately seen as threats to the community. The character of John Proctor is an example of a non-conformist as he believes in justice. Proctor’s sarcastic remark against Reverend Parris: “I like not the smell of this ‘authority,’” highlights his disagreement with Parris’s power and values. The sensory imagery emphasises Proctor’s non-conformist attitude and shows his deviance towards Parris, who is considered the highest power in society as he is the man closest to God. Proctor’s blasphemous exclaim: “I say God is dead!,” is a subversion of the Puritan society and theocratic values. The high modality emphasises his rebellion against Puritanism and emphasises his nonconforming nature. His refusal to conform to the Puritan values ultimately ends in his demise. The ripping of his confession and death symbolises his refusal to conform and his integrity; he does not want to be used to justify the witch hunt and the injustices the court has done. He does not want the other people to be seen as guilty for their crimes, when they weren’t; he does not want to be seen by others as a symbol of falseness …show more content…

The Fishes, led by Julian, is a non-conformist revolutionary group who are “at war with the British government until they recognise equal rights for all immigrants in Britain.” The high modality of “at war” emphasises their non-conformist nature and difference in values; the Fishes fight for refugees’ justice and subvert the fascist values of the British government. Rebellion amongst other members of the population can also be seen in a scene with Theo on the train. Cuarón uses a long continuous shot is used as the audience follows him on his journey, which creates a documentary feel and makes the film more realistic. The scene begins with an anti-immigration propaganda played on the train and the camera slowly pans over Theo and to the windows where the rebels could be seen throwing rocks onto the train. The slow pan from the anti-immigration propaganda to the rebels emphasise the dissension in the society; the rebels disagree with the British government’s values and policies. Cuarón represents people and politics in a unique and evocative way through an exploration of conformity and non-conformity in a dystopian

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