The Voting Rights Act Of 1965

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In America, there has always been a constant battle amongst the majority and the minorities.The majorities, the whites, of the U.S. has always been looking down upon the minorities of the nation. They were constantly looking for new ways to avert minorities from getting representation in America. But as Black activism increased and the economy required more labor needs, the federal government had to act in order to keep the nation under control. Finally, in 1965 two acts were passed in order to fulfill the demands of the minorities. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 were two legislations that sought to eradicate racial discrimination by providing political power and representation to the minorities. Although racial discrimination did not fully eradicate after the implementation of those two laws in America, it paved to the foundation of the ultimate goal which is yet to come. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was established in order give Blacks and other minorities a chance to receive political powers. Its main purpose was to prohibited literacy tests, to prohibit devices created to dilute Black votes, and to mandate federal government to supervise votes and registration. Prior to the Voting Rights Act of 1965, racial discrimination was at its peak, especially because of the Jim Crow laws and the Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) ruling. African Americans would have their own neighborhoods, schools, markets, and etc. for only for their colors. Likewise, White people would also have their own neighborhoods, schools, markets, and etc. for their own colors. This racism caused violence and tensions across the nation, especially in the South. But even through the discriminations, African Americans wer... ... middle of paper ... ...Immigration was told to be a national security issue. The Voting Rights Act and the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 were both legislations that were created to eliminate racial discrimination in America. Although it was successful, new problems arose preventing the U.S. to achieve full eradication of racial discrimination. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was going great until the Supreme Court case Shelby v. Holder, causing the Voting Rights Act to loose its original powers. Likewise, The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 was going great until the 9/11 incident, where immigration became a national security. Overall, both of the legislation were created to remove racial discrimination in this nation. It did not fully abolish racial discrimination, but it allowed the U.S. to become racially unbiased to a certain extent, with the future having more to come.
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