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The Veldt by Ray Bradbury

Good Essays
Throughout the short story “The Veldt," Bradbury uses foreshadowing to communicate the consequences of the overuse of technology on individuals. Lydia Hadley is the first of the two parents to point out the screams that are heard on the distance where the lions are. George soon dismisses them when he says he did not hear them. After George locks the nursery and everyone is supposed to be in bed, the screams are heard again insinuating that the children have broken into the nursery, but this time both the parents hear them. This is a great instant of foreshadowing as Lydia points out that "Those screams—they sound familiar" (Bradbury 6). At that moment, Bradbury suggests that George and Lydia have heard the screams before. He also includes a pun by saying that they are “awfully familiar” (Bradbury 6) and giving the word “awfully” two meanings. At the end we realize that “the screams are not only awfully familiar, but they are also familiar as well as awful" (Kattelman). When the children break into the nursery, even after George had locked it down, Bradbury lets the reader know that the children rely immensely on technology to not even be able to spend one night without it. The screams foreshadow that something awful is going to happen because of this technology.
In the short story, little things are mentioned that foreshadow what is about to happen. The screams are one of the main things. When George enters the nursery after Wendy and finds that it is now a forest full of color, there is an instant of doubt that maybe there never was any Africa or lions after all. George proves the suspicions wrong once he “picked up something that lay in the comer near where the lions had been” (Bradbury). Bradbury describes the wallet to have...

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... it as their parents. The love for a machine can never be as real as the love for another human being. The fact that the children have more affection towards the machines means that the relationship between them and other human beings is not strong enough therefore they distance themselves from the rest of the world.

Works Cited

Bernardo, Jr., Anthony J. “The Veldt.” Masterplots II: Short Story Series, Revised Edition (2004): 1-3. Literary Reference Center. Web. 31 Jan. 2014.
Bradbury, Ray. “The Veldt.” 1950. Digital file.
Hart, Joyce. “Critical Essay on ‘The Veldt.’” Short Stories for Students. Ed. Ira Mark Milne. Vol. 20. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resource Center. Web. 31 Jan. 2014.
Kattelman, Beth. “Critical Essay on ‘The Veldt.’” Short Stories for Students. Ed. Ira Mark Milne. Vol. 20. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resource Center. Web. 31 Jan. 2014.
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