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The Theme of Prejudice In To Kill A Mocking Bird

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The Theme of Prejudice In To Kill A Mocking Bird A dominant theme in the novel 'To Kill a Mocking Bird' is the cruelty that people inflict upon others. In the small old, tired town of Maycomb most people do not hold on to their convictions when they are put under pressure from others and as result lose their individuality and suffer from prejudice. From the beginning of the novel we are shown prejudice by the children's prejudice towards Arthur Radley. Who at the age of 18 committed a crime and due to strong beliefs of his father a Baptist minister was locked up from society. He is a victim of strong social prejudice. Boo is at the centre of gossip and superstition. He is a character surrounded with mystery and suspense. At first we do not know whether or not the eerie tale's surrounding Boo are true or not. Miss Maudie tells us a non-bias character that " Miss Stephanie Crawford even told me once she woke up in the middle of the night and found him looking in the window at her." In which she replies "what did you do Stephanie, move over in bed and make room for him?" Suggesting that she does not follow the ways of others and judge Boo as she believes that everyone has their faults and that no one is perfect. Scandalous rumours such as Boo breathing on azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was because he had breathed on them or that any stealthy small crimes committed in Maycomb were his work make him appear as a kind of monster. But gradually as the children grow they become more friendly and understanding towards Boo. Taking on board Atticus's teachings that you could not possible know another persons situation unless you stand in ... ... middle of paper ... ...gifts Mr Nathan Radley covers up the whole in the tree stopping all communication. At the end of the novel we then find out that Boo is a normal decent man who saves Jem and Scout from Mr Bob Ewell when he attacks them after the Halloween event. Tom on the other hand could not prevent his prejudice and no matter what a great caring and loving man he was would never be respected or believed over a white women. " I did not appreciate the subtlety of Tom's predicament, he could not have dared to strike a white woman under any circumstances and expect to live long, so he took the first opportunity to run." By the end of the novel Scout and Jem have grown up and realised that they do not have to follow the ways of Maycomb but to stand up for what they believe in and not to follow the town's prejudice and evil, cruel ways.
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