The System Of Trial By Jury Operates

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The System Of Trial By Jury Operates A jury system consists of seven to twelve people, depending on the case and the court appearing in. Twelve jurors are used in Crown Court criminal cases for indictable offences. The Queens Bench Division of High Court where the cases involved are civil cases also have twelve jurors. These are cases involving libel and slander, fraud, malicious prosecution and false imprisonment. In civil cases at a County Court, eight jurors are present, although this is rare. Seven to eleven jurors are present at suspicious death cases at the Coroners Court. Specialist juries have been used within complex cases, usually fraud, as sometimes the cases can be complicated The selection process has been that since 1972, names were taken at random from the electoral role. The Juries Act, 1974 section 1, states that those who qualify for jury service are anyone aged between eighteen and seventy who have been a resident within the United Kingdom for five years since the age of thirteen. This should ensure that the selection is completely random, although within Birmingham, only one percent of jurors were of Asian or West Indian origin when almost thirteen percent make up the population. Those who are ineligible for jury service, of which there is no blame, are people who are mentally ill, any persons involved in religious work, e.g. Nuns, Priests as it is believed that their religious views could over-rule the evidence, or anyone involved within the justice system, e.g. Police and Judges as it is believed that their views will be biased in favour of the justice system and the prosecution. The Criminal Justice an... ... middle of paper ... ... Within Northern Ireland, no juries are used, but a system called the Diplock Court. As the community is divided into two by religion, the Protestants and the Catholics, it would be unjust to have, for example, a catholic on trial against a jury of predominantly Protestants, as this would cause great conflict and unjust verdicts not based on the evidence, but on the defendant's religion. Although there are many disadvantages to the modern system of a trial by jury, it is believed to be a fair judgement by the general public, and although could use a few improvements, it is probably the most well structured and reliable system when compared to the new ideas that are being suggested. It has been seen to work for justice for centuries, and has many strong advantages and is preferred by many over replacing the jury.
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