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The Struggle Of Women And The Women's Rights Movement

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During the course of history, women have always fought to improvement esteem, equivalence, and the equal rights as men. Nevertheless, this mission has been challenging because of the notion in which menfolk are higher to and have the right to rule over women. This way of life has drenched the societal construction of civilizations all the way through the creation. Even in nowadays periods women are still stressed for rights that men take for granted. The free-for-all of women rights was even more problematic for women. Wifehood and parenthood were considered as women's most importantjobs. In the 20th era, however, women in somecountries won the right to vote and improved their educational and job opportunities. Conceivably most significant, they fought for and to anenormousstep accomplished a reconsideration of customaryvisions of their role in society. This value has drenched the social structure of societies throughout the world. Even in today’s times women are still struggling for rights that men take for granted. The struggle of women rights was even more problematic for women of color because not only did they have to deal with issues of sexism, they also had to deal with discrimination.
The first known women’s right conference was held in Seneca Falls, New York in July 1848. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott grew organized a group of women to deliberate antislavery and willpower. Stanton also formed her draft of The Declaration of Sentiments on the 1776 Declaration of Independence. After finalizing their article it established hundreds of signatures from men and women. The journalists and ordained priests made a ridicule of Stanton and Mott’s declaration, which affected many of the women who signed the declaration, ...

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Matilda Josyln Gage, e. a. (2001, February). 1876 Declaration of Rights. Retrieved July 23, 2011 from Sunshine for Women :http://www.pinn.net/~sunshine/book-sum/1876.html
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