The Structure of the Book, Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

616 Words3 Pages
When a story is read, it usually isn’t expected for it to end where it began. In the story, Of Mice and Men, that is exactly what John Steinbeck intended. George and Lennie’s story began by the clearing next to the river. George was explaining to Lennie in the most vivid way he could about the little place that they’d get one day. They’d live off the fat of the land, own animals, and Lennie could tend the rabbits. The story ends the same way, but with the irony of their dream dying where it began. The author also explains how sensitive dreams can be and how people, even best friends, have to make the most unthinkable of sacrifices. The irony of this circular structure can be explained in several different aspects. George and Lennie were so focused and dedicated to achieving their dream, that even after all their hard work, the irony was that they never made their dream a reality. That happens in real life too. Someone can plan, dream, work hard, and strive to achieve whatever they want, but sometimes, the slightest turn of events can shatter their entire aspiration. George and Lenni...
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