preview

The Story of an Hour: Sixty Minutes of Freedom

“To love someone deeply gives you strength. Being loved by someone deeply gives you courage.”(Lao Tzu). In Kate Chopin’s, “The Story of an Hour”, it tells of a heart trouble married woman, Louise Mallard, who learns that the man she loved and married, Brently has died. Mrs. Mallard’s behavior and emotions have shocked her entire family as she finds it a joyful and powerful event that may change her life for the hour that she has remaining to live. Mrs. Mallard considers his death as a freedom that she has yet longed for over so many years. As many readers begin to express their judgment towards Mrs. Mallard, the aspects of personal relationship may seem to convince those that maybe she was a bit selfish with her response. In the agony of a bitter marriage, “The Story of an Hour” portrays the reality of being in love, being married and finally having female independence.
The emotions that Mrs. Mallard showed as she stood still symbolizes that she indeed loved her husband. As quoted, “And yet she loved him sometimes. Often she did not” (Choplin, 16), which exhibits emotional apathy or indifference. It is what every woman is supposed to do to the man she wishes to marry. Love has to play an important part of a marriage, but some beg to differ. In today’s society people marry for money, citizenship, companionship and a host of other things. In comparison, it relates to Mrs. Mallard reasoning for the joy of her freedom. In earlier centuries, marriage was sacred, genuine, and had meaning. Mr. & Mrs. Mallard, however, showed their love in a more symbolic approach such as language. A quotes from “The Story of an Hour”, proves that Mr. Mallard did love his wife through many expressions and facial

Green 2 gestures. It is stro...

... middle of paper ...

...d not passed was to overbearing for her. Her husband Brently was alive and although, Mrs. Mallard was free so was he. Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour”, provides more than an unhappy marriage, it delivers her ideas on marriage, love and a woman independence from a structure of male dominance. Many would still describe Mrs. Mallard as a selfish, lonely, and sympatric wife, again, there is a disconnect between the outer world and her introverted self. Some of her emotions are described as monstrous; she is
Green 3 described from the outside quite differently since she is “young with a fair, calm face” and has “two white slender hands.” (Choplin 15). Now that Mrs. Mallard has lost her own life and is truly freed from all the world , that doctors would say that the powerful feeling of happiness overpowered her struggle for freedom.

Works Cited

Choplin,16
Lao Tzu
Get Access