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The Romantic Movement In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Frankenstein Often times an author’s background shapes their writing thus instilling a sense of curiosity in the audience. In her work, Frankenstein, Mary Shelley exposes the grotesque aspects of life as it resonates with her past. Considered a Gothic novel, and one of the first Science Fictions, Frankenstein also contains several components of the Romantic Movement. The Romantic Movement was a period in British history when people felt a deep connection to nature, science, and their emotions. Shelley uses the foundation of a Romantic novel to construct a work unlike any other of its time period. Several factors including tone, setting, and mood validate Frankenstein as a Gothic horror novel. Even though Frankenstein is frequently considered…show more content…
Being an author of the Romantic Age, Shelley was greatly influenced by the “explosion” and “appreciation of science and scientific methods” (Galens, “Vol.2” 282). At the Royal Institution in 1812, Mary and her father listened to Humphry Davy’s lectures on chemistry, which have shown to be a great influence on Frankenstein (Holmes 326). Just as Mary was inspired by Davy’s lectures, Victor Frankenstein begins the novel “as an idealistic and dedicated medical student, inspired by the lectures of the visionary professor Waldman at Ingolstadt” (Holmes…show more content…
The lurid tone of the novel is maintained through the core elements of the Gothic horror genre. Often, a Gothic novel slyly portrays the authors “repressed anxieties” (Galens, “A Study Guide” 191). Research shows that Frankenstein “reflected [Shelley’s] deepest psychological fears and insecurities, such as her inability to prevent her children’s deaths, her distressed marriage to a man who showed no remorse for his daughters’ deaths, and her feelings of inadequacy as a writer” (Galens, “A Study Guide” 191). Different aspects of Shelley’s tragic life immensely influence numerous features of the plot of her most famous work, Frankenstein. The death surrounding Shelley pulls her into a deep depression where she envisions a life with resurrection (Galens, “A study Guide” 181; Schoene-Harwood