The Rise of the Beast in Lord of the Flies

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Explain the emergence and rise of the beast in Lord of the flies by William Golding: Introduction. (1911 - 1993) Golding wrote Lord of the Flies shortly after learning of the horrors of World War II and the Holocaust. Here is some information about him. He was born in 1911 at Saint Columb Minor in Cornwall, England, Sir William Gerald Golding was educated at the Marlborough Grammar School, where his father taught, and later at Brasenose College, Oxford. Although educated to be a scientist at the wishes of his father, he soon developed a great interest in literature, becoming first devoted to Anglo-Saxon and then writing poetry. At Oxford he studied English literature and philosophy. Following a short period of time in which he worked at a settlement house and in small theatre companies as both an actor and a writer, Golding became a schoolmaster at Bishop Wordsworth's School in Salisbury. During the Second World War he joined the Royal Navy and was involved in the sinking of the German battleship Bismarck, but following the war he returned to Bishop Wordsworth's School, where he taught until the early sixties. In 1954, Golding published his first novel, Lord of the Flies, which details the adventures of British schoolboys stranded on an island in the Pacific who descend into barbaric behaviour. Although at first rejected by twenty-one different publishing houses, Golding's first novel becomes a surprise success. E.M. Forster declared Lord of the Flies the outstanding novel of its year, while Time and Tide called it "not only a first-rate adventure story but a parable of our times". Golding continued to develop similar themes concerning the inherent violence in human nature in his next novel, the ... ... middle of paper ... ...m probably saw killing Ralph as merely a game. In view of the fact that Ralph was being hunted down by everyone on the island, he would have been probably killed had it not been for the arrival of the Navy officers. Golding does not choose to allow Ralph to be killed. This could be because he does not wish to allow evil to win. However, whether the boys would be able to lead a normal life after their experience on the island is doubtful. The fact that the boys used the beast to avoid self-knowledge and the evil inside themselves is clearly evident at the end of the novel, when they all begin to cry at the realization of what they have done. Finally, it is important to realize that the only reason they attain self-knowledge is because of the arrival of an adult figure on the island, which allows law and order to be restored, thereby eliminating the evil.
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