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The Rise of Nazism During World War Two

Powerful Essays
To this day it remains incomprehensible to justify a sensible account for the uprising of the Nazi Movement. It goes without saying that the unexpectedness of a mass genocide carried out for that long must have advanced through brilliant tactics implemented by a strategic leader, with a promising policy. Adolf Hitler, a soldier in the First World War himself represents the intolerant dictator of the Nazi movement, and gains his triumph by arousing Germany from its devastated state following the negative ramifications of the war. Germany, “foolishly gambled away” by communists and Jews according to Hitler in his chronicle Mein Kampf, praises the Nazi Party due to its pact to provide order, racial purity, education, economic stability, and further benefits for the state (Hitler, 2.6). Albert Speer, who worked closely under Hitler reveals in his memoir Inside the Third Reich that the Führer “was tempestuously hailed by his numerous followers,” highlighting the appreciation from the German population in response to his project of rejuvenating their state (Speer, 15). The effectiveness of Hitler’s propaganda clearly served its purpose in distracting the public from suspecting the genuine intentions behind his plan, supported by Albert Camus’ insight in The Plague that the “townsfolk were like everybody else, wrapped up in themselves; in other words, they were humanists: they disbelieved in pestilences”(Camus, 37). In this sense “humanists” represent those who perceive all people with virtue and pureness, but the anti-humanist expression in the metaphor shows the blind-sidedness of such German citizens in identifying cruel things in the world, or Hitler. When the corruption within Nazism does receive notice, Hitler at that point given h...

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.... By this he portrays characters that take it amongst themselves to fight the horrors of the illness out of love for their own innocent humanity, and although it does not personally affect many of the ones who do this, they understand that they could suffer to the same degree if it did hit them, where they would seek help the same way the victims did. With this Camus counters the failure from way too many during the time of Nazi Germany to challenge and overcome Hitler’s Reich, which stemmed from fear and the evil of ignorance that remains inexcusable. The impact of the holocaust proves that humankind does not believe in an essential understanding, that individuals are fundamentally sadistic until silenced, and if attention never gets drawn to the reality of such exploitations, the madness spirals so out of control that humans convince themselves it does not exist.