The Qualities Required to Win a Conflict

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The Qualities Required to Win a Conflict

Perhaps one would think a survivor in a scandal would be the “good guy”. One might expect a successful person to be likeable and compassionate. Usually it is an assumption of a person whom possesses great charisma, positivity, and friendliness. Also we would assume it would be a law abiding citizen, well educated, and a role model, whom was simply caught in a bad predicament. Several instances in reality prove otherwise, and this character could be quite the opposite. This person is clever enough to manipulate others and protect oneself from an imminent fall from grace. In order to persevere from the price fixing controversy in a riveting, yet cutthroat profession of art auctioneering and business, a person must possess three defining attributes. One must possess these three key elements; which are: tenacity, meticulousness, and apathy. These aforementioned characteristics are all of which the Christie’s former CEO Christopher Davidge had possessed in order to prevail above the scandal and be successful in life.

When leading one of the top Auction arts houses in the world, these powerhouses’ employees ought to expect results whether if they are good or bad. They expect loyalty and strong leadership. They place their lives in the chief executive’s hands, and it is the responsibility of the executive to commit wholeheartedly in the company to insure profit, growth, and stability. Obtaining an almost equal market share with its accomplice and competitor Sotheby’s, Davidge achieved this exact quality. He wanted to make an example of himself and achieve greatness than his forefathers could not have done. In addition, his personal desire to dethrone the prior executive propelled him to continue on his narcissistic path of glory. Even the Christie’s employees were uncomfortable around him. His successor Ed Dolman stated, “Chris was a remote, distant, dictatorial figure,” (132) which is another example of his tenacity in his leadership position. His commitment to staying afloat when the art market took a dive displayed his willingness to see a problem to completion. In 1995, after a year of the pivotal meeting between the chairmen of both Auction Houses, Alfred Taubman and Sir Anthony Tennant, Sotheby’s CEO Dede Brooks and Davidge had agreed there would be no more zero commissions, and prearranged very specific non-negotiable sliding scale of percentages. Although, a year later, the Art market revived and the auction houses reaped higher benefits and profits without knowing the deal underneath the table.
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