The Pros And Cons Of Education

924 Words4 Pages
Ever since middle school, I have thoroughly enjoyed education. My school focused on sparking interest, and knowledge in each child that walked under it’s arching blue bricks. Teachers were involved and enthusiastic, making giant clay volcanoes that bubbled and fizzed through a crazy concept called science. Math times table worksheets became an exciting game. When the teacher said go, students would flip their papers while the drowning noise of pencils scratching paper indicated everyone wanted to be the first to finish. I continue to recount fondly the memory of my forth grade English teacher. After we would turn in a essay, she selected the top three to read in front of the class. The readings were set up in the library, similar to a book…show more content…
This pressure is so high and so important because it effects practically everything in our school system. The scores on these simple tests determine teacher jobs, salary, school funding, and the student’s future education. When most adults hear children complaining about the pressure of school the same general response is upheld. “This test will prepare you for the real world where there are stressful and strenuous tasks.” College and a job are both these things, yet they do not negate the truth that all the pressures of these tests fall on the shoulders of kids who are barely able to drive a car. The expectation of students to score well is pushed by teachers, school districts, states, and colleges. The states want high scores so they threaten budgets of school districts. The districts enforce this by threatening teacher jobs. The fun of learning I remember from my childhood is removed from the equation, and is then replaced by over-arching expectations to excel at state tests. The problem with passing these tests is that one must rely on test taking ability and not just…show more content…
Through countless years of the almost Pavlovian training to test well, students are thrown into the annual testing room without real world knowledge. Schools do not prepare students for actual problems such as taxes, how to manage money, and other simple lessons due to the importance they place on testing skills. Due to the pressure placed on teachers to have students that ace these tests, teachers can resort to cheating to help their salary and job security. Highly intelligent kids can be edged out of their college of choice because someone else has mastered the task of testing well. A kid from my own highschool was ranked 200 in the class, yet he scored an incredible 2300 on his SAT. This can only support the claim that he knew how to test well on the SAT rather than scoring incredible grades in normal classroom curriculum. Classroom curriculum takes a backseat to the ever present task of preparing for the next standardized
Open Document