The Pros And Cons Of Common Core

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A quote that has always stuck with me is this, from George Washington Carver: “Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom.” When thinking of children, who go to school as early as four years old in this country, that quote has a special resonance. After all, educators and childcare professionals go into their careers driven by a desire to help children manage their lives and mature into capable adults. What says capability more than total freedom and autonomy? Interestingly, many teachers and educators feel anything but free when it comes to the current education system in this country. There are laws in place that are ostensibly meant to facilitate learning for students of all abilities and ages, but backlash -- from educators…show more content…
The primary concern among parents and educators has been the difficulty they’ve faced in grasping the new concepts presented by Common Core. Because of the seeming difficulty of math questions, in particular, many parents have spoken out against Common Core, but it is important to remember that “viral” videos and posts featuring difficult math problems do not represent the entirety of the standards. Other complaints include that the standards are not yet specific enough and the coursework may be too rigorous for younger students. The pros to Common Core are numerous, however, and include that the benchmarks are international, meaning American students should soon catch up to global students in reading, math, and a number of other subjects in which we have fallen behind. Students switching to new schools will find it easier to acclimate because every child will be learning the same thing. Tests, lesson plans, and assignments are all theoretically interchangeable under the new…show more content…
In the case of No Child Left Behind, I believe that doing away with it was only right because, as mentioned in previously-cited documents, it was encouraging teachers to teach “to the test.” Common Core does not do this, although it does encourage teachers to take a measured approach to their material. Common Core, then, is effective and supportive of healthy outcomes for children and families. My only suggestion is simply to invest in more training for educators, who have expressed concerns about not understanding the material meant to be taught, as mentioned before. Test results from the first wave of testing done under Common Core indicate that in the future, there will be an increased focus on contextual learning as opposed to the much-detested teaching “to the test.” It already appears that the initiative is headed in a very positive
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